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Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice:
doi: 10.1097/01.idc.0000236973.74205.10
Reflections of an ID Specialist

Proposals on Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome's and Other New Infectious Diseases' Clinical Prevention Practices

Han-You, Xu Jr

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Author Information

Department of Emergency Medicine, Clinical Institute, Xin Ye County People's Hospital, Henan Province, China.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Xu Han-You Jr, Xin Ye County People's Hospital, Henan Province, 473500, China. E-mail: abc13579-you@126.com.

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Abstract

Objective: To prevent and cure the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) disease and other new infectious diseases in adults and in children.

Method: Summarize the author's clinical experiences and the knowledge on good prevention and clinical practice of infectious diseases.

Result: The relatively concrete prevention and clinical practice of treatment methods of SARS and other new infectious diseases are reached.

Conclusions: The practices have been proven. These breakthrough proposals on the SARS prevention and clinical practice are very useful. These proposals may be used by others as reference to prevent other new infectious diseases.

As severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has caused heavier damage to people's health and the economy of China and other countries, the author, a doctor who has worked in a county level department of SARS prevention special ward, cannot help but wants to do something to cure the SARS disease. So at the beginning of the SARS outbreak, the author discussed, initiated, and wrote proposals and clinical practice for related specialists and officials to use as reference. The author hopes that these proposals are very useful to control and cure the SARS disease. The other new infectious diseases may occur like the SARS disease. So the new guidelines on prevention and clinical practice to prevent and cure the SARS disease and other new infectious diseases in adults and in children are imperative to be built. The author hopes these proposals may be very useful.1

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RESULTS

The SARS Prevention

The SARS has been proved as an infectious disease by the special virus. China and other countries have been putting the disinfection as the most important clinical treatment and prevention. The disinfection is indeed important. But controlling the SARS infectious virus by administration is also much too important, that is, control the infectious SARS patients to control the disease infection. As we know, China's SARS outbreak areas are in the cities which are densely populated, so are the other countries' SARS outbreaks.

So the author proposes that the SARS patients and the suspected SARS patients shall transfer at once to the areas out of the related cities, on the remote areas. The remote areas shall be an open field relatively far from cities and villages and shall have good roads, water, electricity, etc, the life's convenience factors. The new simple and easy but standard SARS prevention wards shall be constructed in a few days. In this way, the SARS infection may be easily controlled.

As we know, infectious diseases have mainly 3 factors that affect infectivity: the cause of infectious disease, the susceptible persons, and the infectious pathways. The infectious pathways and the susceptible persons are the most important points to prevent infections, especially when SARS is not totally understood. The leprosy prevention has been putting the patients in much too remote areas and has good results, which is the best example to control the SARS infectious disease.

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Doctors and Nurses of the SARS Treatment

The doctors, nurses, and the related workers in the new remote SARS wards shall be the same doctors, nurses, etc, at the cities' SARS hospitals in the populated areas, or the same principles as before would be followed to choose the doctors, nurses and related workers.

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Transferring of the SARS Patients

The transferring of SARS patients and the suspected SARS patients shall be done like the present principles of transferring. But the author proposes that transferring roads may change conveniently, not on the same road.

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Numbers of the Remote Standard SARS Wards

It is easy to understand that the remote SARS wards may not be only one. To determine how many wards are needed to be built, the number and location of SARS patients shall be considered and also the positions where it is easy to transfer the patients.

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Practices in China

It is known to all that Beijing, China, has built the special prevention wards like what I have written in this paper, the Beijing's Xiao Tang Shan Hospital, and this hospital has brought the better results. Shanghai, China, also has built the special prevention wards or center like what I have written in this paper.

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CONCLUSIONS

These proposals may be used by others as reference to prevent other infectious diseases. Because the other new infectious diseases may occur like the SARS disease very quickly, the new guidelines to prevent and cure the SARS disease and other new infectious diseases in adults and in children are imperative to be built.

The practices have been proven. Thus, the proposed model for SARS prevention and clinical practice is very useful as a reference for building the new guidelines to prevent and treat or cure the modern new infectious diseases, which occur and outbreak in the cities which are densely populated, such as SARS. Therefore, the new infectious diseases with new outbreak model such as SARS should use the new prevention and clinical practice model of my proposals.

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REFERENCE

1. Peng Wenwei. Summary of communicable diseases. In: Peng Wenwei, ed. Textbook of infectious diseases. 6th ed. Beijing: People's Medical Publishing House; 2004;1-16.

© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.