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Eczema Herpeticum: A Case Report and Review of Literature

Beverido, Luis G. MD; Nanjappa, Sowmya MBBS, MD; Braswell, Diana S. MD; Messina, Jane L. MD; Greene, John N. MD, FACP

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice: March 2017 - Volume 25 - Issue 2 - p 94–96
doi: 10.1097/IPC.0000000000000471
Case Reports

Eczema herpeticum in immunocompromised cancer patients if not identified and treated early can be life threatening. It is commonly found in patients with skin integrity disorders, atopic dermatitis, or immunocompromised patients with herpes simplex type 1 infection. The trunk, head, and neck are regions that commonly are involved. Early antiviral therapy is crucial in immunocompromised hosts to prevent a rapid progression of infections. We present a case of adult generalized eczema herpeticum and a review of the differential diagnosis, and management options.

Eczema herpeticum (EH) is a unique manifestation of disseminated herpes simplex virus infection most commonly observed in an individual with atopic dermatitis or other forms of eczema. If not identifi ed and treated early, this infection can be life threatening. Early antiviral therapy is crucial since EH is still considered a dermatological emergency in immunocompromised hosts.

From the *Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute; †Internal Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, ‡Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine; §Departments of Anatomic Pathology and Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center; ∥Departments of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Pathology and Cell Biology, and Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine; and ¶Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL.

Correspondence to: John N. Greene, MD, FACP, Chief, Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiologist, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, FOB-3. E-mail: john.greene@moffitt.org.

The authors have no funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

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