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Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Native Valve Endocarditis: The Role of Antimicrobial Therapy

Karchmer, Adolf W. MD

Erratum

In the article by Karchmer, appearing in Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice, Vol. 20, No. 2, pp. 100–108, entitled “Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Native Valve Endocarditis: The Role of Antimicrobial Therapy”, the following commercial support information was inadvertently omitted from the submission: “This activity is supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Cubist Pharmaceuticals.”

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice. 21(1):74, January 2013.

Infectious Diseases in Clinical Practice:
doi: 10.1097/IPC.0b013e31824a8bcb
NFID Clinical Updates
Abstract

Abstract: The effective management of complicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and native valve endocarditis requires an appropriate course of antimicrobial agents (proper agent, duration, and dose) and, where possible, timely removal of foci of infection. Treatment options for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, and MRSA complications are discussed. The use of vancomycin for the treatment of MRSA bacteremia and the challenges associated with its use are described (ie, decreased susceptibility, emergence of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus [hVISA] isolates, and nephrotoxicity). The use of aminoglycosides or rifampin as adjunct therapy with vancomycin to treat S. aureus bacteremia does not appear to be supported by data in the medical literature. The optimal length of therapy for S. aureus infections is presented, and the need for periodic reassessment of vancomycin and daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) is emphasized. The author suggests an approach to treatment of persistent MRSA bacteremia based on recent data.

Author Information

From the Division of Infectious Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA.

Correspondence to: Adolf W. Karchmer, MD, Division of Infectious Diseases, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 110 Francis St, Suite GB, Boston, MA 02215. E-mail: akarchme@bidmc.harvard.edu.

The author has no funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

This publication is based on a presentation by Dr Karchmer during the 2009 satellite symposium preceding the 47th Annual Meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and has been updated by the author to reflect interim developments.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.