Quality of Life, Body Mass Index, and Physical Activity Among Uterine Cancer Patients

Lin, Lilie L. MD*; Brown, Justin C. BS*; Segal, Saya MD; Schmitz, Kathryn H. PhD*

International Journal of Gynecological Cancer: July 2014 - Volume 24 - Issue 6 - p 1027–1032
doi: 10.1097/IGC.0000000000000166
Uterine Cancer

Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the independent and joint effects of body mass index (BMI) and physical activity (PA) on overall quality of life (QoL) in survivors of uterine cancer.

Methods: We conducted a survey among uterine cancer patients who received curative therapy at the University of Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2010. Surveys assessed the weight, height, PA (college alumnus survey), and QoL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Gynecologic Oncology Group).

Results: The response rate to the survey was 43%. Among 213 patients, the mean (SD) BMI was 31.1 (8.9) kg/m2, and 48% reported greater than or equal to 150 min·wk−1 of PA. Higher BMI was independently associated with poorer overall QoL (P = 0.050), including physical (P = 0.002) and functional well-being (P = 0.008). Higher min·wk−1 of PA was not independently associated with any QoL outcome. However, among patients who engaged in greater than or equal to 150 min·wk−1 of PA, the negative association between BMI and overall QoL was attenuated (P = 0.558), whereas among patients who engaged in less than 150 min·wk−1 of PA, the negative association between BMI and overall QoL persisted (P = 0.025). Among patients who engaged in greater than or equal to 150 min·wk−1 of PA, the negative association between BMI and physical and functional well-being was attenuated (P = 0.765 and P = 0.284), whereas among patients who engaged in less than 150 min·wk−1 of PA, the negative association between BMI and physical and functional well-being persisted (P < 0.001 and P = 0.010), respectively.

Conclusions: Body mass index is associated with poorer QoL among uterine cancer patients. The findings from this cross-sectional study are consistent with the hypothesis that endometrial cancer survivors who are able to perform 150 min/wk of PA may be protected from the negative effects of BMI on QoL.

*University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia PA; and †University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Lilie L. Lin, MD, Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, TRC2 W, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104. E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu.

Dr Segal received funding from NIH Grant # T32HD007440-17.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Received January 8, 2014

Accepted April 1, 2014

© 2014 by the International Gynecologic Cancer Society and the European Society of Gynaecological Oncology.