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Hospitalizations are increasing among minority patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

Sewell, Justin L. MD, MPH1,*; Yee, Hal F. Jr MD, PhD1; Inadomi, John M. MD1

doi: 10.1002/ibd.21008
Original Clinical Articles

Background:: Rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) appear to be increasing among nonwhite populations outside the United States, but national data describing the incidence and prevalence of IBD are not available for minority patients. The aim of this study was to examine time trends of hospital discharge among minority patients with IBD.

Methods:: Nationally representative data describing hospital discharges were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Survey for the years 1994 to 2006. Race‐specific annual proportions of hospitalizations including a discharge diagnosis of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were calculated. Trends in proportions were assessed for statistical significance using the extended Mantel–Haenszel χ‐square test for trend.

Results:: The proportion of hospitalizations including a discharge diagnosis of IBD increased significantly from 1994 to 2006 among the total population and among Asian, black, and white patients separately. Increases were statistically significant when analysis was performed for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis combined and separately. Marked increases were seen among Asians.

Conclusions:: The proportion of hospitalizations including a discharge diagnosis of IBD increased significantly among minority and nonminority patients from 1994 through 2006. The causes underlying these changes are not certain and should be further investigated. Inflamm Bowel Dis 2009

1GI HOPE (Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics) Research Program and Center for Specialty Access and Quality, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, San Francisco General Hospital, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California

*Reprints: University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave., Rm. S‐357, Box 0538, San Francisco, CA 94143

Email: justin.sewell@ucsf.edu

Received 26 April 2009; Accepted 29 April 2009

Published online 2 July 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com).

© Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.
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