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Home Healthcare Nurse:
doi: 10.1097/NHH.0b013e318223c49f
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Say Goodbye to Wet-to-Dry Wound Care Dressings: Changing the Culture of Wound Care Management Within Your Agency

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For 58 additional continuing nursing education articles on skin and wound care topics, go to nursingcenter.com/ce.

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Say Goodbye to Wet-to-Dry Wound Care Dressings: Changing the Culture of Wound Care Management Within Your Agency—One Home Health Agency's Experience

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CE TEST QUESTIONS

GENERAL PURPOSE: To provide registered professional nurses with information on how to implement alternatives to traditional wet-to-dry wound care dressings.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After reading this article and taking this test, you should be able to:

1. Summarize the research findings and issues surrounding the need for a no wet-to-dry initiative.

2. Outline the authors' recommendations for planning and implementing a no wet-to-dry protocol.

1. The percentage of patients currently in a home health episode with a diagnosis of disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (including pressure ulcers) is

a. 4.6%.

b. 9.3%.

c. 14.8%.

d. 19.5%.

2. The actual goal of true wet-to-dry dressings is

a. wound protection.

b. moist healing.

c. mechanical debridement.

d. infection control.

3. According to Founder's estimate, gauze is still used as a wound dressing what perentage of the time?

a. 40%

b. 50%

c. 60%

d. 70%

4. Wet-to-dry dressings allow the healing cells within the wound to

a. desiccate.

b. granulate.

c. hydrate.

d. approximate.

5. The wet-to-dry dressing process

a. is relatively inexpensive.

b. causes the patient little to no pain.

c. maintains a moist wound environment.

d. removes healthy tissue attached to dry gauze.

6. With wet-to-dry dressings, the debridement is

a. sharp.

b. nonselective.

c. autolytic.

d. efficient.

7. Recent quality initiatives are increasing the focus of home health care on

a. cost.

b. ease.

c. speed.

d. outcomes.

8. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, facilities may

a. use wet-to-dry dressings in limited situations.

b. use alternatives to wet to dry dressings whenever available.

c. not use wet-to-dry dressings for pressure ulcer care.

d. not use wet-to-dry dressing at all.

9. At the agency that implemented no wet-to-dry dressings, the most significant resistance came from

a. physicians.

b. clinical staff.

c. administrators.

d. patients and families.

10. The mandatory staff education for all clinicians that perform wound care focused primarily on

a. change strategies.

b. disadvantages of wet-to-dry methods.

c. fundamentals of wound care and moist healing.

d. OASIS-C quality indicators related to wounds.

11. The article Skip the Knife: Debriding Without Surgery by Ayello and colleagues

a. cites the discrepancies in the definition of wet-to-dry dressings.

b. states specifically when debridement should be stopped.

c. points out the lack of a research base for using wet-to-dry dressings.

d. provide details about wet-to-dry dressings in other wound care scenarios.

12. Protocol development begins with

a. a general format.

b. evidence-based resources.

c. a needs assessment.

d. development of the core portion.

13. Each of the agency's specific wound care protocols contains four elements, one of which is

a. current supplies.

b. referral sources.

c. possible complications.

d. documentation requirements.

14. In the agency's new wound care protocol, collagen hydrogel is an option when the physician's goal is

a. maintaining a moist wound environment.

b. healing an existing infection.

c. faciliating granulation.

d. decreasing bioburden.

15. In the agency's new wound care protocol, silver hydrogel is an option when the physician's goal is

a. maintaining a moist wound environment.

b. healing an existing infection.

c. faciliating granulation.

d. decreasing bioburden.

16. In the agency's new wound care protocol, plain hydrogel is an option when the physician's goal is

a. maintaining a moist wound environment.

b. healing an existing infection.

c. faciliating granulation.

d. decreasing bioburden.

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