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The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Military Traumatic Brain Injury Screening Instrument: Determination of Sensitivity, Specificity, and Predictive Value

Zollman, Felise S. MD; Starr, Christine BA; Kondiles, Bethany BA; Cyborski, Cherina MD; Larson, Eric B. PhD

Section Editor(s): Caplan, Bruce PhD, ABPP; Bogner, Jennifer PhD, ABPP

Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation: January/February 2014 - Volume 29 - Issue 1 - p 99–107
doi: 10.1097/HTR.0b013e318294dd37
Original Articles

Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is referred to as the signature injury of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Given the prevalence of TBI in military personnel, there is a need for validated instruments tailored to accurately screen for TBI in this population.

Methods: Three hundred service members or veterans underwent a novel screen and a comprehensive diagnostic assessment to identify the occurrence of TBI and/or the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder. Negative predictive value, positive predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity were calculated.

Results: This screening tool for TBI yielded sensitivity of 96%, specificity of 64%, negative predictive value of 95%, and positive predictive value of 69%.

Conclusion: The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Military Traumatic Brain Injury Screening Instrument has a high negative predictive value and high sensitivity for TBI. This tool identifies individuals likely to have sustained a TBI. Moreover, it detects those who are likely not to have sustained such an injury and can be reassured in this regard. Because such distinction can be made with a high degree of accuracy in rapid and cost-effective fashion, it represents an important contribution to the armamentarium of TBI screening tools.

Memory and Cognitive Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, NorthShore University Health System, Glenview, Illinois (Dr Zollman); Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (Mss Starr and Kondiles and Dr Larson); Rehabilitation Services, National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Cyborski); and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (Dr Larson).

Corresponding Author: Felise S. Zollman, MD, Memory and Cognitive Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, NorthShore University Health System, 2180 Pfingston Rd, Glenview, IL 60026 (fzollman@northshore.org).

This study was funded by grants from the Robert M. McCormick Tribune Foundation, the Julius N. Frankel Foundation, the Joseph G. Nicholas Foundation, and the Barker Welfare Foundation.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.headtraumarehab.com).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins