Skip Navigation LinksHome > January/February 2014 - Volume 29 - Issue 1 > The Boston Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury–Lifetime (BA...
Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation:
doi: 10.1097/HTR.0b013e3182865859
Original Articles

The Boston Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury–Lifetime (BAT-L) Semistructured Interview: Evidence of Research Utility and Validity

Fortier, Catherine Brawn PhD; Amick, Melissa M. PhD; Grande, Laura PhD; McGlynn, Susan PhD; Kenna, Alexandra PhD; Morra, Lindsay BA; Clark, Alexandra BA; Milberg, William P. PhD; McGlinchey, Regina E. PhD

Section Editor(s): Caplan, Bruce PhD, ABPP; Bogner, Jennifer PhD, ABPP

Supplemental Author Material
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Abstract

Objective:

Report the prevalence of lifetime and military-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans and validate the Boston Assessment of TBI–Lifetime (BAT-L).

Setting:

The BAT-L is the first validated, postcombat, semistructured clinical interview to characterize head injuries and diagnose TBIs throughout the life span.

Participants:

Community-dwelling convenience sample of 131 OEF/OIF veterans.

Design:

TBI criteria (alteration of mental status, posttraumatic amnesia, and loss of consciousness) were evaluated for all possible TBIs, including a novel evaluation of blast exposure.

Main Measures:

BAT-L, Ohio State University TBI Identification Method (OSU-TBI-ID).

Results:

About 67% of veterans incurred a TBI in their lifetime. Almost 35% of veterans experienced at least 1 military-related TBI; all were mild in severity, 40% of them were due to blast, 50% were due to some other (ie, blunt) mechanism, and 10% were due to both types of injuries. Predeployment TBIs were frequent (45% of veterans). There was strong correspondence between the BAT-L and the OSU-TBI-ID (Cohen κ = 0.89; Kendall τ-b = 0.95). Interrater reliability of the BAT-L was strong (κs >0.80).

Conclusions:

The BAT-L is a valid instrument with which to assess TBI across a service member's lifetime and captures the varied and complex nature of brain injuries across OEF/OIF veterans' life span.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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