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Twenty Years of Pharmacology

Glenn, Mel B. MD; Wroblewski, Bruno MS, RPh, CGP

Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation: January/February 2005 - Volume 20 - Issue 1 - p 51–61
Original Articles

During the past 20 years in pharmacology, a number of innovations have appeared that have resulted in significant changes in the drugs available for people with traumatic brain injury. Among the anticonvulsants, antidepressants, and antipsychotics, new drugs have appeared with fewer cognitive side effects. In these classes of drugs, as well as among central nervous system stimulants, once-daily or other sustained-release preparations have been introduced that make it considerably more likely that the patient will take his or her medication, with smaller fluctuations in drug levels as well. New drugs have also resulted in a greater number of medications for the clinician to choose from. The overall effect has been a dramatic change in pharmacology that has benefited people with traumatic brain injury.

Outpatient and Community Brain Injury Rehabilitation Programs, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass (Dr Glenn); and NeighborCare, Woburn, Mass (Mr Wroblewski).

Corresponding author: Mel B. Glenn, MD, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (e-mail: mglenn@partners.com).

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.