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Professional practice leadership roles: The role of organizational power and personal influence in creating a professional practice environment for nurses

Lankshear, Sara; Kerr, Michael S.; Spence Laschinger, Heather K.; Wong, Carol A.

Health Care Management Review:
doi: 10.1097/HMR.0b013e31826fd517
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Abstract

Professional practice leadership (PPL) roles are those roles responsible for expert practice, providing professional leadership, facilitating ongoing professional development, and research. Despite the extensive implementation of this role, most of the available literature focuses on the implementation of the role, with few empirical studies examining the factors that contribute to PPL role effectiveness. This article will share the results of a research study regarding the role of organizational power and personal influence in creating a high-quality professional practice environment for nurses. Survey results from nurses and PPLs from 45 hospitals will be presented. Path analysis was used to test the hypothesized model and relationships between the key variables of interest. Results indicate that there is a direct and positive relationship between PPL organizational power and achievement of PPL role functions, as well as an indirect, partially mediated effect of PPL influence tactics on PPL role function. There is also a direct and positive relationship between PPL role functions and nurses’ perceptions of their practice environment. The evidence generated from this study highlights the importance of organizational power and personal influence as significantly contributing to the ability of those in PPL roles to achieve desired outcomes. This information can be used by administrators, researchers, and clinicians regarding the factors that can optimize the organizational and systematic strategies for enhancing the practice environment for nursing and other health care professionals.

Author Information

Sara Lankshear, PhD, RN, is Principal Consultant, Releve` Consulting Services, Tiny, Ontario, Canada. E-mail: sara@releveconsulting.com.

Michael S. Kerr, PhD, is Associate Professor, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

Heather K. Spence Laschinger, PhD, RN, FAAN, FCAHS, is Distinguished University Professor, Arthur Labatt Family Chair in Health Human Resource Optimization, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

Carol A. Wong, PhD, RN, is Associate Professor, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationship with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

© 2013 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins