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Practice Bulletin No. 185 Summary: Pelvic Organ Prolapse

doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002393
College Publications
Practice Bulletins List of Titles

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common, benign condition in women. For many women it can cause vaginal bulge and pressure, voiding dysfunction, defecatory dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction, which may adversely affect qual-ity of life. Women in the United States have a 13% lifetime risk of undergoing surgery for POP (1). Although POP can occur in younger women, the peak incidence of POP symptoms is in women aged 70–79 years (2). Given the aging population in the United States, it is anticipated that by 2050 the number of women experiencing POP will increase by approximately 50% (3). The purpose of this joint document of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Urogynecologic Society is to review information on the current understanding of POP in women and to outline guidelines for diagnosis and management that are consistent with the best available scientific evidence.

For a comprehensive overview of pelvic organ prolapse, the full-text version of this Practice Bulletin is available athttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000002399.

Committee on Practice Bulletins—Gynecology and American Urogynecologic Society. This Practice Bulletin was developed by the Committee on Practice Bulletins—Gynecology and the American Urogynecologic Society in collaboration with Paul Tulikangas, MD.

INTERIM UPDATE: This Practice Bulletin is updated as highlighted to reflect recent systematic review evidence on the use of biologic and synthetic mesh grafts in the repair of anterior pelvic organ prolapse. For complete details on these updates, please see the full-text version.

This information is designed as an educational resource to aid clinicians in providing obstetric and gynecologic care, and use of this information is voluntary. This information should not be considered as inclusive of all proper treatments or methods of care or as a statement of the standard of care. It is not intended to substitute for the independent professional judgment of the treating clinician. Variations in practice may be warranted when, in the reasonable judgment of the treating clinician, such course of action is indicated by the condition of the patient, limitations of available resources, or advances in knowledge or technology. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists reviews its publications regularly; however, its publications may not reflect the most recent evidence. Any updates to this document can be found onwww.acog.orgor by calling the ACOG Resource Center.

While ACOG makes every effort to present accurate and reliable information, this publication is provided “as is” without any warranty of accuracy, reliability, or otherwise, either express or implied. ACOG does not guarantee, warrant, or endorse the products or services of any firm, organization, or person. Neither ACOG nor its officers, directors, members, employees, or agents will be liable for any loss, damage, or claim with respect to any liabilities, including direct, special, indirect, or consequential damages, incurred in connection with this publication or reliance on the information presented.

Full-text document published concurrently in the November 2017 issue of Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery.

Copyright November 2017 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, posted on the Internet, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission from the publisher.

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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 409 12th Street, SW, PO Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920

Official Citation: Pelvic organ prolapse. Practice Bulletin No. 185. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstet Gynecol 2017;130:e234–50.

Received October 06, 2017

Accepted October 06, 2017

© 2017 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.