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Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety

Kendig, Susan JD, MSN; Keats, John P. MD, CPE; Hoffman, M. Camille MD, MSCS; Kay, Lisa B. MSW, MBA; Miller, Emily S. MD, MPH; Moore Simas, Tiffany A. MD, MPH; Frieder, Ariela MD; Hackley, Barbara PhD, CNM; Indman, Pec EdD, MFT; Raines, Christena MSN, RN; Semenuk, Kisha MSN, RN; Wisner, Katherine L. MD, MS; Lemieux, Lauren A. BS

doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001902
Contents: Consensus Statement

Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.

The Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health supports routine screening for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders for pregnant and postpartum women.

National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health, St. Louis, Missouri; Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis, Maryland; Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado; Cigna Health Insurance, Lutherville, Maryland; Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Health Care, Worcester, Massachusetts; Zucker Hillside Hospital-Northwell Health Physician Partners, Glen Oaks, New York; Women's Health Services and Resiliency Initiative, Montefiore South Bronx Health Center, Bronx, New York; Regroup Therapy, San Jose, California; Obstetrical Liaison and Community Outreach, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Alliance for Innovation in Maternal Health (AIM), American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC; Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; Strategic Health Care Initiatives, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

Corresponding author: Susan Kendig, JD, MSN, Director of Policy, National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health, 505 C Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002; email: skendig@npwh.org.

Financial Disclosure The Department of Psychiatry at Northwestern University received contractual fees for Dr. Wisner's consultation to Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP (New York City), who represent Pfizer Pharmaceutical Company. The other authors did not report any potential conflicts of interest.

This article is being published concurrently in the March/April 2017 issue (Vol. 46, No. 2) of Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing and the March/April 2017 issue (Vol. 62, No. 2) of Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health.

Ms. Semenuk and Ms. Lemieux are employees of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College). All opinions expressed in this article are the authors' and do not necessarily reflect the policies and views of the College. Any remuneration that the authors receive from the College is unrelated to the content of this article.

Each author has indicated that he or she has met the journal's requirements for authorship.

© 2017 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.