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Executive Summary of the reVITALize Initiative: Standardizing Obstetric Data Definitions

Menard, M. Kathryn MD, MPH; Main, Elliott K. MD; Currigan, Sean M. MPH

doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000322
Contents: Current Commentary

Precision in language has become critically important with the evolution of the electronic medical record and proliferation of measurement in vital statistics and health care. Taking the opportunity to standardize clinical definitions is a fundamental step in building a robust national data infrastructure that is useful and useable for clinicians and patients. The reVITALize Initiative leads and coordinates a national multidisciplinary movement to standardize obstetric data definitions for written and verbal clinical communication, electronic health record data capture, vital statistics and public health surveillance, measurement, quality improvement, reporting, and research.

The reVITALize Initiative leads national efforts for standardized obstetric definitions for documentation across electronic health records, vital statistics, public health surveillance, and measurement systems.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford University, and the California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California; and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

Corresponding author: Sean M. Currigan, MPH, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024; e-mail: scurrigan@acog.org.

Supported by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC, the March of Dimes, White Plains, New York, the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Washington, DC, and the United Health Foundation, Detroit, Michigan.

Sean Currigan is an employee of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. All opinions expressed in this article are the authors' and do not necessarily reflect the policies and views of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Any remuneration that the authors receive from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is unrelated to the content of this article.

Financial Disclosure The authors did not report any potential conflicts of interest.

© 2014 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.