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Musculoskeletal Causes of Chronic Pelvic Pain: What a Gynecologist Should Know

Gyang, Anthony MD; Hartman, Melissa DO; Lamvu, Georgine MD, MPH

Obstetrics & Gynecology:
doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e318283ffea
Current Commentary
Abstract

Ten percent of all gynecologic consultations are for chronic pelvic pain, and 20% of patients require a laparoscopy. Chronic pelvic pain affects 15% of all women annually in the United States, with medical costs and loss of productivity estimated at $2.8 billion and $15 billion per year, respectively. Chronic pelvic pain in women may have multifactorial etiology, but 22% have pain associated with musculoskeletal causes. Unfortunately, pelvic musculoskeletal dysfunction is not routinely evaluated as a cause of pelvic pain by gynecologists. A pelvic musculoskeletal examination is simple to perform, is not time-consuming, and is one of the most important components to investigate in all chronic pelvic pain patients. This article describes common musculoskeletal causes of chronic pelvic pain and explains how to perform a simple musculoskeletal examination that can be easily incorporated into the gynecologist physical examination.

In Brief

Musculoskeletal conditions are a prevalent cause of chronic pelvic pain that can be diagnosed easily by a thorough history and physical examination.

Author Information

Advanced and Minimally Invasive Gynecology, Florida Hospital, and Family and Women's Health at Avalon Park, Orlando, Florida.

Corresponding author: Anthony Gyang, MD, Advanced and Minimally Invasive Gynecology, 2415N Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32804; e-mail: tonygyang@hotmail.com.

Financial Disclosure The authors did not report any potential conflicts of interest.

© 2013 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists