Resident Experience on Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Rotations and Perceived Knowledge

Steiner, Anne Z. MD, MPH; Fritz, Marc MD; Sites, Cynthia K. MD; Coutifaris, Christos MD, PhD; Carr, Bruce R. MD; Barnhart, Kurt MD, MSCE

Obstetrics & Gynecology:
doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3182056457
Original Research
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent to which duration and quality of reproductive endocrinology rotations are associated with residents' knowledge of reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

METHODS: An anonymous, multiple-choice survey was provided to 4,744 examinees during the 2008 Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology In-Training Examination. The survey queried residents' experiences on their reproductive endocrinology and infertility rotation, satisfaction with the quality and duration of the rotation, and knowledge of reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Binomial regression was used to estimate the relationship between components of the reproductive endocrinology and infertility rotation and self-reported knowledge of reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

RESULTS: Forty percent of residents described their knowledge of reproductive endocrinology and infertility as poor. Fewer weeks dedicated to reproductive endocrinology and infertility increased the risk of poor knowledge (P<.001). Required vacation during the rotation and non–reproductive endocrinology and infertility coverage more than two times a week was associated with a 40% increase in risk of perceived poor knowledge (relative risk [RR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI]): 1.20–1.60; and RR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.16–1.70, respectively), while 3 hours of didactics per week were associated with a 61% reduction in risk (RR 0.39, 95% CI: 0.31–0.50).

CONCLUSION: A number of residents perceive their knowledge of reproductive endocrinology and infertility to be poor. Conflicting commitments during the reproductive endocrinology rotation results in both lower satisfaction and less knowledge. There is the potential to improve resident knowledge of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, and perhaps other aspects of obstetrics and gynecology training, with focused rotations, including didactics.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II

In Brief

Short reproductive endocrinology rotations with multiple coverage duties and calls and limited didactics are associated with poor resident-perceived knowledge in reproductive endocrinology.

Author Information

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts; the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

Supported by the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility.

Corresponding author: Anne Z. Steiner, MD, MPH, University of North Carolina, CB#7570, 4001 Old Clinic Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; e-mail: asteiner@med.unc.edu.

Financial Disclosure Anne Steiner is a member of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (SREI). Marc Fritz served as the subspecialty representative (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility) to the Executive Board of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College), and in that capacity, facilitated access to CREOG data referred to in this article, and directed the effort to produce the survey from which the data in this article derive. During the time the data described were generated, he served as the President and as a board member of the SREI. He has had travel or accommodation expenses covered or reimbursed by the College. Cynthia K. Sites has served on the SREI board during the past 3 years; expenses reimbursed for serving on an NIH study section on Reproduction, Andrology, and Gynecology during the past 3 years. Bruce R. Carr has served on the board for the College; served as a consultant for, and received travel or accommodation expenses covered or reimbursed from Abbott Labs; provided expert testimony for Clark Thomas Winters; has received grants or has grants pending from Neuroscience, Wyeth, and Boehringer-Ingelheim; received royalties for seminars in Reproductive Medicine; received payment for development of educational presentations, including service on speaker's bureau and received travel or accommodation expenses covered or reimbursed from Novo Nordisk.

© 2011 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.