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Uterine Myomas: An Overview of Development, Clinical Features, and Management

Wallach, Edward E. MD; Vlahos, Nikos F. MD

Obstetrics & Gynecology:
doi: 10.1097/01.AOG.0000136079.62513.39
Clinical Gynecologic Series: An Expert's View
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To review the biology and the pathophysiology of uterine myomas, focus on options for management, and emphasize principles that will render the decision-making process as logical as possible.

DESIGN: Literature review and synthesis of the authors’ experience and philosophy.

RESULTS: Uterine myomas are the most common solid pelvic tumors in women. There is increasing evidence that they have a genetic basis and that their growth is related to genetic predisposition, hormonal influences, and various growth factors. Treatment choices are wide and include pharmacologic, surgical, and radiographically directed intervention. Most myomas can be followed serially with surveillance for development of symptoms or progressive growth.

CONCLUSION: The past century has witnessed development of highly sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic technology for myomas. The tools currently at our disposal permit greater management flexibility with safe options, which must be tailored to the individual clinical situation.

In Brief

The past century has witnessed development of highly sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic technology for leiomyomata; current tools permit greater management flexibility with safe options that must be tailored to each individual clinical situation.

Author Information

From the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland.

We have invited select authorities to present background information on challenging clinical problems and practical information on diagnosis and treatment for use by practitioners

We thank the following individuals who, in addition to members of our Editorial Board, will serve as referees for this series: Dwight P. Cruikshank, MD, Ronald S. Gibbs, MD, Gary D. V. Hankins, MD, Phillip B. Mead, MD, Kenneth L. Noller, MD, and Catherine Y. Spong, MD.

Received February 11, 2004. Received in revised form May 19, 2004. Accepted May 21, 2004.

Address reprint requests to: Edward E. Wallach, MD, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 600 North Wolfe Street, Phipps Building #201, Baltimore, MD 21287-1201; e-mail: jensam2@comcast.net and ewallach@jhmi.edu.

© 2004 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.