Skip Navigation LinksHome > April 1997 - Volume 89 - Issue 4 > Preeclampsia: Is Induction of Labor More Successful?.
Obstetrics & Gynecology:
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Preeclampsia: Is Induction of Labor More Successful?.

XENAKIS, ELLY M.-J. MD; PIPER, JEANNA M. MD; FIELD, NANCY MD; CONWAY, DEBORAH MD; LANGER, ODED MD

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Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that preeclamptic women are more readily inducible than are nonpreeclamptic women, regardless of cervical condition.

Methods: One hundred eighty-three preeclamptic women and 461 nonpreeclamptic women requiring labor induction were studied prospectively. Patients were categorized by Bishop score, parity, gestational age, and method of induction. Outcome variables were success of induction and cesarean delivery rates.

Results: Failed induction was significantly more common in the preeclamptic group (8.2% versus 1.7%; odds ratio [OR] 5.06; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97, 13.28), as was cesarean delivery (28% versus 16%; OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.36, 3.18). When controlled by logistic regression for Bishop score, parity, method of induction, epidural anesthesia, macrosomia, and gestational age, a fourfold higher risk of failed induction and a twofold higher risk of cesarean delivery were found in the preeclamptic group.

Conclusions: Induction of labor in preeclamptic women has a higher risk of failure and consequently of cesarean delivery than in nonpreeclamptic women. The vast majority of patients achieve vaginal delivery.

(C) 1997 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

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