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Reassessment of Adrenal Androgen Secretion in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

CARMINA, ENRICO MD; GONZALEZ, FRANK MD; CHANG, LILLY MD; LOBO, ROGERIO A. MD
Obstetrics & Gynecology: June 1995
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Objective: To reevaluate the clinical significance of elevations of adrenal androgens in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Methods: Thirty women with PCOS and ten ovulatory controls were evaluated. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate and 11[beta]-hydroxyandrostenedione were measured before and after 3 and 6 months of GnRH agonist (GnRH-A) therapy. All controls and 15 women with PCOS received intravenous ACTH before and after GnRH-A therapy

Results: Twenty-one (70%) of the women with PCOS had elevations of DHEA sulfate, and 16 (53%) had elevations in 11[beta]-hydroxyandrostenedione. Only two women with PCOS had normal values of both adrenal androgens. After GnRH-A therapy, only 11 subjects (37%) had elevated values of DHEA sulfate. Four of 16 women had reductions in 11[beta]-hydroxyandrostenedione. Only those with elevated baseline DHEA sulfate levels had reductions after GnRH-A therapy. The reduction of DHEA sulfate with GnRH-A correlated with the reduction in androstenedione. Of the subjects who had reductions in DHEA sulfate with GnRH-A therapy, there was a blunted response of DHEA to ACTH after treatment.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the ovary may influence the prevalence and magnitude of adrenal androgen excess in PCOS.

(C) 1995 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists