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Improvements in Sleep Problems Among the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Participants

Ahn, SangNam PhD, MPSA; Jiang, Luohua PhD; Smith, Matthew Lee PhD, MPH, CHES; Ory, Marcia G. PhD, MPH

doi: 10.1097/FCH.0000000000000045
Original Articles

Sleep is increasingly important in public health because sleep problems are associated with multiple negative health and quality-of-life outcomes, especially among those with chronic conditions. While evidence-based self-management programs have been widely studied, little is known about their specific impacts on sleep. Using data from the National Study of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (n = 1168), improvements in sleep problems were observed for all subgroups except men. More sleep problem reductions were observed among younger participants compared with their older counterparts. This study confirmed the value of self-management programs for ameliorating sleep problems across diverse participant groups.

Division of Health Systems Management and Policy, School of Public Health, The University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee (Dr Ahn); Department of Health Promotion and Community Health Sciences (Drs Ahn and Ory) and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Dr Jiang), School of Public Health, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas; and College of Public Health, Department of Health Promotion and Behavior, The University of Georgia, Athens (Dr Smith).

Correspondence: SangNam Ahn, PhD, MPSA, Division of Health Systems Management and Policy, School of Public Health, The University of Memphis, 133 Robison Hall, Memphis, TN 38152-3530 (sahn@memphis.edu).

The authors thank the 22 delivery sites and the participants who enrolled in the National Study of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program from 2010 to 2011. They also thank Ms Lindsey Post, who helped to revise this manuscript.

A grant support was taken from the Administration on Aging through American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding for the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. This work was supported by the National Council on Aging through contracts to Texas A&M Health Science Center (Principal Investigator: Marcia Ory). In addition, funding was made possible (in part) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cooperative agreements to Prevention Research Centers Programs in support of the Healthy Aging Research Network (1U48/DP001924).

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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