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Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health: Reducing Health Disparities by Addressing Social Determinants of Health

Buckner-Brown, Joyce PhD, MHS, RRT; Tucker, Pattie BSN, MPH, DrPH; Rivera, Mark PhD; Cosgrove, Shannon MHA; Coleman, James L. EdD; Penson, Aisha MEd, CHES; Bang, David PhD, MPH, CHES

Family & Community Health:
doi: 10.1097/FCH.0b013e318202a720
Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH): Translating Processes of Change and Attributing Improved Health Outcomes to Social Determinants of Health Programs: Original Article
Abstract

Poor people and people of color are more likely to live shorter and sicker lives and are less likely to survive a host of chronic illnesses. Policies and organizational practices that improve the environments in which people live, work, learn, and play can reduce these disparities. Using the World Health Organization's “Call to Action” principles as a discussion framework, we highlight the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health programs that have developed and applied such strategies to address chronic illnesses. Several, in turn, foster health equity.

Author Information

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (Drs Buckner-Brown, Tucker, Rivera, and Bang and Ms Cosgrove); Northrop Grumman (Ms Penson), Atlanta, Georgia; and Wateree Community Action, Inc, Sumter, South Carolina (Dr Coleman).

Joyce Buckner-Brown, PhD, MHS, RRT, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health, 4770 Buford Hwy, NE, Mailstop K30, Atlanta, GA 30341 (jbucknerbrown@cdc.gov).

The authors express their sincere appreciation to our REACH collaborators who made this article possible. They include HealthVisions Midwest, Inc, New York University Medical Center, B Free CEED Coalition, the National Hepatitis B Task Force, Orange County Asian and Pacific Islander Community Alliance (OCAPICA) REACH U.S. PATH for Women Program, Pacific Islander Health Careers Pipeline Program Advisory Board, and The California Endowment for their support of OCAPICA's work with Pacific Islander Pipeline.

Disclaimer: The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved