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Epidemiology:
doi: 10.1097/01.ede.0000392280.42745.94
Abstracts: ISEE 22nd Annual Conference, Seoul, Korea, 28 August-1 September 2010: Air Pollution - Exposure Characterization and Health Effects

Association Between Proximity to Traffic and Type 2 Diabetes: The Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

Park, Sung Kyun1; O'Neill, Marie1,2; Auchincloss, Amy3; Bertoni, Alain4; Adar, Sara2; Szpiro, Adam5; Navas-Acien, Ana6,7; Szklo, Moyses7; Kaufman, Joel8; Diez Roux, Ana2

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1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; 3Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA; 4Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Science, Winston-Salem, NC; 5Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 6Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; 7Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; and 8Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Abstracts published in Epidemiology have been reviewed by the societies at whose meetings the abstracts have been accepted for presentation. These abstracts have not undergone review by the Editorial Board of Epidemiology.

PP-29-030

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Background/Aims:

Although particulate matter has been suggested as a possible risk factor for type 2 diabetes onset, few epidemiologic studies and no longitudinal studies, have been reported. We investigated the associations of proximity to a major roadway, which is a surrogate of traffic pollution exposure with incident of type 2 diabetes and longitudinal changes in fasting serum glucose in multiethnic study of atherosclerosis.

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Methods:

Between 2000 and 2007, we examined 4676 participants free of type 2 diabetes at baseline with a total of 18,479 observations (mean number of exams = 2.5). Type 2 diabetes was defined as fasting glucose of ≥126 mg/dL at any exam or use of antidiabetes medication. At baseline (2000–2002), traffic-related pollution exposure was estimated based on participant's residential proximity to a major roadway (a binary variable based on whether the participant resided within 100 m of the centerline of a highway or within 50 m of the centerline of a major arterial road). Linear mixed models and interval-censored survival analyses were used to model longitudinal changes in fasting glucose (log-transformed) and incident type 2 diabetes, respectively, adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, body mass index, waist circumference, cigarette smoking, and physical activity.

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Results:

Of the participants, 28% were classified as living near a major road. During a median of 5 years follow-up, 403 new type 2 diabetes cases occurred. After controlling for potential confounders, proximity to a major roadway was not associated with fasting glucose at baseline, and there were no associations with changes in fasting glucose over time. No significant association with incident type 2 diabetes was found.

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Conclusion:

This study does not support the hypothesis that long-term traffic pollution exposure may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Additional studies with longer follow-up periods and improved exposure estimates are needed to further investigate the hypothesized association.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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