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Epidemiology:
The Sixteenth Conference of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE): Abstracts

MULTI-CITY STUDIES IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND: THE IMPACT OF AIR POLLUTION ON DAILY MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY

Simpson, Rod*; Williams, Gail†; Barnett, Adrian†; Neller, Anne*; Best, Trudi*; Petroeschevsky, Anna*; Denison, Lyn‡; Neville, Gerard§; Sheppeard, Vicky∥; Runnion, Tina¶

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*University of the Sunshine Coast; †School of Population Health, University of Queensland; ‡Environmental Protection Authority of Victoria; §Environmental Health Unit, Public Health Services, Queensland Health; ∥Environmental Health Branch, NSW Health; ¶Air Quality Management Branch, Department of Environment

ISEE-106

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Introduction:

This paper presents preliminary results from the project funded by the Environment Protection and Heritage Council (EPHC) for 2003–2005: Expansion of the multi-city mortality and morbidity study: the assessment of the impact of air pollution on daily mortality and morbidity in Australian and New Zealand cities, including the use of new particle data sets. The National Environment Protection Council (NEPC) of Australia will report to the EPHC on a review of national air quality health standards in 2005. This project is designed to estimate the associations between air pollution and daily mortality and morbidity for a range of Australian and New Zealand cities.

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Methods:

The study uses case-crossover techniques and standardised time series methodologies to conduct meta-analyses for estimates of the acute effects of air pollution on daily mortality and daily hospital admissions in Australian and New Zealand cities. Hospital admissions data include respiratory admissions, admissions for asthma and cardiovascular admissions for the following age groups; 0, 1–4, 5–14, 15–64, 65–74, 75+ and total (all ages). Mortality data will be aggregated into broad categories of respiratory mortality, cardiovascular mortality and total mortality, with broad age groups (0–14, 15–64, 65–74, 75+, Total) (all ages). The pollutants considered include particles (nephelometer, PM10 and PM2.5 data), ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Confounding effects by weather variables and factors such as public holidays, bush fires and influenza epidemics will be included.

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Results:

Preliminary results for the study will be presented.

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Discussion:

The results will be compared with overseas studies and will provide input into the review of national air quality standards.

© 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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