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Creator: Alice S.Y. Lee, MD
Duration: 26:22
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Lee talks with Jonathon Graff, DO, the medical director of the Outpatient Observation Unit at Banner Baywood Medical Center in Mesa, AZ, about an elderly patient who triggered a stroke alert.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration:
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, look at ocular ultrasound in this video, sharing tips for assessing the eye and diagnosing retinal detachment, which in the past required a referral to an ophthalmologist and often delayed therapy. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 11:36
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, and James R. Roberts, MD, with tips and tricks for repairing nail bed lacerations in children. Tip #1: Don’t lie to them. Give them just enough details to be able to complete your procedure. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. Listen in to this video as Dr. Mellick discusses double sickening in this mother’s daughter. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 4:13
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, with an alternative to the Morgan Lens: eye irrigation using IV saline, a nasal cannula, and the connector piece from a Salem Sump kit. This procedure is less invasive and less traumatic for patients and easier for providers. A win-win! Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 9:37
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This month James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, start a series on ultrasound with a look at the basic functionality of the machine and how to look for foreign bodies in the extremities. Find out all you need to know by watching this video. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. Listen in to this video as Dr. Mellick discusses double sickening in this mother’s daughter. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:01
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the anxiety demonstrating how to set up an aspiration and irrigation system, which dramatically simplifies the entire process. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 3:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, bring you pearls for how to code your use of ultrasound. Watch this video to learn how to make sure you document everything you do and use to receive full reimbursement. Don’t forget to visit their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause. James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 8:31
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This new bonus feature from James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, brings you tips, tricks, and pearls to make your emergency medicine practice easier. This month, their first Clinical Pearl features the JR Knot, invented by its namesake James Roberts. This easy pearl will show you how to secure a central line. Read the Roberts’ blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:47
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Varicella cases have markedly declined, and presentations are often atypical since the advent of immunizations, so younger physicians are less aware of the appearance and clinical presentations of this viral infection. This video shows disseminated varicella in an HIV patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:51
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Multiple methods are touted for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, but the Davos technique is a nontraumatic, patient-controlled, and auto-reduction technique that does not require the use of anesthesia. Dr. Larry Mellick reviews it in this video and blog post, which you can find at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 2:44
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This bonus feature from James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, brings you tips, tricks, and pearls to make your emergency medicine practice easier. This month, their second Clinical Pearl features how to diagnose and treat a mallet finger. Find out all you need to know by watching this video. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:43
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the performance anxiety associated with this condition by teaching how to mix up the phenylephrine used for intracavernosal blocks, which means this penile compartment syndrome doesn’t languish while EPs wait for the urologist. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 5:54
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, note that foreign body removal may not be emergent, but it can be urgent. And your secret weapon for removing these items is fluoroscopy. Read their blog post at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause, and then watch this video to make sure you know all the basics.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:24
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This third video shows the diffuse petechiae from septic emboli of life-threatening infective endocarditis. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick , and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 6:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Patients don’t come to the ED for headache unless the severity and duration are intolerable or the headache is frighteningly different. Emergency physicians need as many therapeutic arrows in their quiver as possible to treat those headaches. The bilateral paraspinous cervical injection with small amounts of bupivacaine in the lower neck is an excellent option for managing tough headache cases.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:45
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Shoulder dislocations are fairly common orthopedic emergencies presenting to the emergency department. Watch this video, the first of three from Dr. Larry Mellick this month, to learn tips for reducing an inferior shoulder reduction. Find more information about shoulder reductions in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A tripwire is a wire stretched near ground level that activates a booby trap, and some chief complaints come with their own built-in tripwires. Without a doubt, acute scrotal pain is one of those, and torsion of the testicle is one cause of acute scrotal pain that emergency physicians cannot afford to miss.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:02
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Most emergency physicians are comfortable with using IO needles during the resuscitation of moribund or unconscious patients, but their skills and experience in using IO needles in awake patients are not quite as sharp. Dr. Larry Mellick shares his past mistakes to help EPs learn which pitfalls to avoid.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:05
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Read Dr. Butts’ article, “Think SUPRAclavicular for Subclavian Lines,” in the July 2013 issue, and then view this video that shows an “in-plane” approach to a vessel (using a simulator). As the needle is inserted from the end of the transducer, rather than at its mid-point, it traverses the path of the transducer. This enables the entire needle, including the tip, to be visible throughout the procedure, minimizing complications such as arterial puncture or pneumothorax.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:20
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:00
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. This video shows an oldie but goodie tip for how to position a child properly for ear cleaning. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 9:55
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Using pain as a diagnostic tool may seem contrary to the basic tenets of medicine, but it can be a lifesaving maneuver. Dr. Mellick reviews a new test for conversion disorder, created by Mario Soto, MD, in which saline is squirted into the eye of a comatose or seizing patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:07
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Ketamine is a fascinating drug with multiple potential applications in the emergency department, but emergency physicians should consider this phencyclidine-like dissociative agent for pain management. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to hear how ketamine helped this patient with cancer pain.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Don’t cringe when you think of giving epinephrine outside of cardiac arrest, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate techniques for giving well calibrated and exact doses of epinephrine. This first video shows pulse dosing during intubation. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:06
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Read Dr. Butts’ article, “Comet Tails and Lung Sliding: Evaluating for Pneumothorax,” in the December 2013 issue, and then view this video that demonstrates a normal “sliding” motion of the pleura back and forth. Comet tail artifacts are also seen to appear and disappear, emanating from the pleural border. The combination of the presence of sliding and comet tail artifacts virtually excludes a pneumothorax.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 8:22
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Mellick’s suspicions smoldered for years; he even thought the problem resided with his technique. But one patient made him realize that the textbooks were just wrong: Wire cutters were not going to release a zipper from penile skin.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 5:45
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, note that emergency providers must always consider a procedure’s impact on patient comfort, care, and outcome. Nowhere is that more of a concern than draining a sensitive vaginal abscess. Read their blog post at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause, and then watch this video for how to treat a broken tooth in the ED.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:04
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
An indirect method for assessing proper placement of the ET tube is to watch the pleura for the presence of the slide sign. The pleura are easily identified from the anterior chest wall utilizing the high-frequency transducer. The transducer should be placed just inferior to the clavicle in the mid-clavicular line. Pointing the indicator toward the patient’s head will produce an image that is easy to interpret. Once the skin, soft tissue, and ribs have been identified, the pleura will be seen as a hyperechoic (white) line running just deep to the rib. In real time, the pleura slide back and forth with respiration.
Creator: Peter Goldman, MD
Duration: 0:54
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Watch Dr. Peter Goldman demonstrate his invention that delivers life-saving oxygen and albuterol to asthma patients in the critical moments between a medical incident and the arrival of medical professionals.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 12:14
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Chest tube placement borders on the barbaric, says Dr. Mellick. The use of large-bore chest drainage devices is not supported by most guidelines, and he explains in this month’s EduBlog that needle aspiration is just as effective, with a small-bore chest drain working if needle aspiration fails.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency medicine has continuously redefined itself by absorbing expertise traditionally owned by other specialties. The tracheostomy is a case in point. Watch this video, the first of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see replacement of a tracheostomy tube. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:34
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:59
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency physicians, expert at a wide variety of procedures, will continue to play an important rill in performing the procedures traditionally done by other specialties. Watch this video, the third of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see a needle aspiration of a peritonsillar abscess. Find more information about prcoedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:02
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Pausing chest compressions for even a few seconds reduces the chances that CPR will be successful, but CPR always screeches to a halt for defibrillation. Dr. Larry Mellick demonstrates why there’s no need to be hands-off during defib.
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