Most Popular Videos

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Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration:
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, look at ocular ultrasound in this video, sharing tips for assessing the eye and diagnosing retinal detachment, which in the past required a referral to an ophthalmologist and often delayed therapy. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 13:47
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
It’s such a simple concept, yet has so many potential life-saving applications. The Abdominal Aortic and Junctional Tourniquet may be the future of advanced cardiac life support. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more about how the AAJT, fresh from the battlefield, is saving lives in the ED.
Creator: Alice S.Y. Lee, MD
Duration: 26:22
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Lee talks with Jonathon Graff, DO, the medical director of the Outpatient Observation Unit at Banner Baywood Medical Center in Mesa, AZ, about an elderly patient who triggered a stroke alert.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:47
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Varicella cases have markedly declined, and presentations are often atypical since the advent of immunizations, so younger physicians are less aware of the appearance and clinical presentations of this viral infection. This video shows disseminated varicella in an HIV patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
The time for possible salvage and survival of a torsed testicle is commonly thought to be six to eight hours, but Dr. Larry Mellick says one patient’s testicle was saved after 70 hours. Watch this video of torsion in a 15-year-old, and find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 9:37
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This month James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, start a series on ultrasound with a look at the basic functionality of the machine and how to look for foreign bodies in the extremities. Find out all you need to know by watching this video. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 11:36
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, and James R. Roberts, MD, with tips and tricks for repairing nail bed lacerations in children. Tip #1: Don’t lie to them. Give them just enough details to be able to complete your procedure. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Alice S.Y. Lee, MD
Duration: 22:00
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Alice Lee, MD, points out that Dr. Amal Mattu, MD, always says if your patient is sweating, you should be too. In this month’s screencast, she and Scott Megna, MD, discuss and diagnose a 36-year-old man who presents with burning pain and shortness of breath.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:23
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick looks at the evidence for double simultaneous defibrillation, which appears to work in the electrophysiology lab and that anecdotal evidence has shown saves lives in the prehospital setting and in the emergency department. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. Listen in to this video as Dr. Mellick discusses double sickening in this mother’s daughter. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 4:13
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, with an alternative to the Morgan Lens: eye irrigation using IV saline, a nasal cannula, and the connector piece from a Salem Sump kit. This procedure is less invasive and less traumatic for patients and easier for providers. A win-win! Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. Listen in to this video as Dr. Mellick discusses double sickening in this mother’s daughter. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Martha Roberts, ACNP, PNP
Duration: 5:12
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Martha Roberts, ACNP, PNP, and James R. Roberts, MD, ask, what do you do when something weird and wild comes into your emergency department? This month, they we mean lacerations over tattoos or body piercings. Cosmetic repair of injuries involving tattoos and piercings are important to patients, and here’s how you can ensure proper wound closure while preserving the underlying body art.

Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 3:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, bring you pearls for how to code your use of ultrasound. Watch this video to learn how to make sure you document everything you do and use to receive full reimbursement. Don’t forget to visit their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause. James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 2:44
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This bonus feature from James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, brings you tips, tricks, and pearls to make your emergency medicine practice easier. This month, their second Clinical Pearl features how to diagnose and treat a mallet finger. Find out all you need to know by watching this video. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 8:22
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Mellick’s suspicions smoldered for years; he even thought the problem resided with his technique. But one patient made him realize that the textbooks were just wrong: Wire cutters were not going to release a zipper from penile skin.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 9:55
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Using pain as a diagnostic tool may seem contrary to the basic tenets of medicine, but it can be a lifesaving maneuver. Dr. Mellick reviews a new test for conversion disorder, created by Mario Soto, MD, in which saline is squirted into the eye of a comatose or seizing patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:06
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Read Dr. Butts’ article, “Comet Tails and Lung Sliding: Evaluating for Pneumothorax,” in the December 2013 issue, and then view this video that demonstrates a normal “sliding” motion of the pleura back and forth. Comet tail artifacts are also seen to appear and disappear, emanating from the pleural border. The combination of the presence of sliding and comet tail artifacts virtually excludes a pneumothorax.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency medicine has continuously redefined itself by absorbing expertise traditionally owned by other specialties. The tracheostomy is a case in point. Watch this video, the first of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see replacement of a tracheostomy tube. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:05
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Read Dr. Butts’ article, “Think SUPRAclavicular for Subclavian Lines,” in the July 2013 issue, and then view this video that shows an “in-plane” approach to a vessel (using a simulator). As the needle is inserted from the end of the transducer, rather than at its mid-point, it traverses the path of the transducer. This enables the entire needle, including the tip, to be visible throughout the procedure, minimizing complications such as arterial puncture or pneumothorax.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 8:31
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This new bonus feature from James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, brings you tips, tricks, and pearls to make your emergency medicine practice easier. This month, their first Clinical Pearl features the JR Knot, invented by its namesake James Roberts. This easy pearl will show you how to secure a central line. Read the Roberts’ blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 12:14
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Chest tube placement borders on the barbaric, says Dr. Mellick. The use of large-bore chest drainage devices is not supported by most guidelines, and he explains in this month’s EduBlog that needle aspiration is just as effective, with a small-bore chest drain working if needle aspiration fails.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:24
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This third video shows the diffuse petechiae from septic emboli of life-threatening infective endocarditis. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick , and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Don’t cringe when you think of giving epinephrine outside of cardiac arrest, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate techniques for giving well calibrated and exact doses of epinephrine. This first video shows pulse dosing during intubation. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:04
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
An indirect method for assessing proper placement of the ET tube is to watch the pleura for the presence of the slide sign. The pleura are easily identified from the anterior chest wall utilizing the high-frequency transducer. The transducer should be placed just inferior to the clavicle in the mid-clavicular line. Pointing the indicator toward the patient’s head will produce an image that is easy to interpret. Once the skin, soft tissue, and ribs have been identified, the pleura will be seen as a hyperechoic (white) line running just deep to the rib. In real time, the pleura slide back and forth with respiration.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A tripwire is a wire stretched near ground level that activates a booby trap, and some chief complaints come with their own built-in tripwires. Without a doubt, acute scrotal pain is one of those, and torsion of the testicle is one cause of acute scrotal pain that emergency physicians cannot afford to miss.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:51
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Multiple methods are touted for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, but the Davos technique is a nontraumatic, patient-controlled, and auto-reduction technique that does not require the use of anesthesia. Dr. Larry Mellick reviews it in this video and blog post, which you can find at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:02
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Pausing chest compressions for even a few seconds reduces the chances that CPR will be successful, but CPR always screeches to a halt for defibrillation. Dr. Larry Mellick demonstrates why there’s no need to be hands-off during defib.
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