Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 9:55
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Using pain as a diagnostic tool may seem contrary to the basic tenets of medicine, but it can be a lifesaving maneuver. Dr. Mellick reviews a new test for conversion disorder, created by Mario Soto, MD, in which saline is squirted into the eye of a comatose or seizing patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 11:36
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, and James R. Roberts, MD, with tips and tricks for repairing nail bed lacerations in children. Tip #1: Don’t lie to them. Give them just enough details to be able to complete your procedure. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 4:13
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, with an alternative to the Morgan Lens: eye irrigation using IV saline, a nasal cannula, and the connector piece from a Salem Sump kit. This procedure is less invasive and less traumatic for patients and easier for providers. A win-win! Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:59
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency physicians, expert at a wide variety of procedures, will continue to play an important rill in performing the procedures traditionally done by other specialties. Watch this video, the third of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see a needle aspiration of a peritonsillar abscess. Find more information about prcoedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency medicine has continuously redefined itself by absorbing expertise traditionally owned by other specialties. The tracheostomy is a case in point. Watch this video, the first of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see replacement of a tracheostomy tube. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:47
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Varicella cases have markedly declined, and presentations are often atypical since the advent of immunizations, so younger physicians are less aware of the appearance and clinical presentations of this viral infection. This video shows disseminated varicella in an HIV patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Don’t cringe when you think of giving epinephrine outside of cardiac arrest, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate techniques for giving well calibrated and exact doses of epinephrine. This first video shows pulse dosing during intubation. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:24
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
For a fantastic instructive 1:24-minute video on treating paronychia, just watch Dr. Larry Mellick, a professor of emergency medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, at work.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:51
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Multiple methods are touted for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, but the Davos technique is a nontraumatic, patient-controlled, and auto-reduction technique that does not require the use of anesthesia. Dr. Larry Mellick reviews it in this video and blog post, which you can find at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:34
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:02
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Pausing chest compressions for even a few seconds reduces the chances that CPR will be successful, but CPR always screeches to a halt for defibrillation. Dr. Larry Mellick demonstrates why there’s no need to be hands-off during defib.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 6:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Patients don’t come to the ED for headache unless the severity and duration are intolerable or the headache is frighteningly different. Emergency physicians need as many therapeutic arrows in their quiver as possible to treat those headaches. The bilateral paraspinous cervical injection with small amounts of bupivacaine in the lower neck is an excellent option for managing tough headache cases.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 10:20
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, delve into the nuances of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis, with tips on managing this easy-to-treat wrist condition. Read their blog post at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause, and then watch this video for how to diagnose and treat De Quervain’s tenosynovitis.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 9:37
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This month James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, start a series on ultrasound with a look at the basic functionality of the machine and how to look for foreign bodies in the extremities. Find out all you need to know by watching this video. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A tripwire is a wire stretched near ground level that activates a booby trap, and some chief complaints come with their own built-in tripwires. Without a doubt, acute scrotal pain is one of those, and torsion of the testicle is one cause of acute scrotal pain that emergency physicians cannot afford to miss.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 2:44
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This bonus feature from James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, brings you tips, tricks, and pearls to make your emergency medicine practice easier. This month, their second Clinical Pearl features how to diagnose and treat a mallet finger. Find out all you need to know by watching this video. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:24
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This third video shows the diffuse petechiae from septic emboli of life-threatening infective endocarditis. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick , and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 0:32
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This first video shows the track marks associated with repeated intravenous injection. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 12:14
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Chest tube placement borders on the barbaric, says Dr. Mellick. The use of large-bore chest drainage devices is not supported by most guidelines, and he explains in this month’s EduBlog that needle aspiration is just as effective, with a small-bore chest drain working if needle aspiration fails.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 5:45
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, note that emergency providers must always consider a procedure’s impact on patient comfort, care, and outcome. Nowhere is that more of a concern than draining a sensitive vaginal abscess. Read their blog post at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause, and then watch this video for how to treat a broken tooth in the ED.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:29
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Read Dr. Butts’ article, “Think SUPRAclavicular for Subclavian Lines,” in the July 2013 issue, and then view this video that shows assessment of the venous anatomy as seen under ultrasound. The internal jugular (IJ) vein is seen as the triangular vessel that appears to fluctuate slightly with respiration. As the view progresses inferiorly, the IJ can be seen to join the SCV, which appears tubular in this orientation.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:57
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This second video shows the piloerection that accompanies withdrawal. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Peter Goldman, MD
Duration: 0:54
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Watch Dr. Peter Goldman demonstrate his invention that delivers life-saving oxygen and albuterol to asthma patients in the critical moments between a medical incident and the arrival of medical professionals.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration: 8:31
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
This new bonus feature from James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, brings you tips, tricks, and pearls to make your emergency medicine practice easier. This month, their first Clinical Pearl features the JR Knot, invented by its namesake James Roberts. This easy pearl will show you how to secure a central line. Read the Roberts’ blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP
Duration:
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
James R. Roberts, MD, & Martha Roberts, CEN, ACNP, look at ocular ultrasound in this video, sharing tips for assessing the eye and diagnosing retinal detachment, which in the past required a referral to an ophthalmologist and often delayed therapy. Read more in their blog at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause.
Creator: Martha Roberts
Duration: 1:27
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
The initial ED management of blisters from burns is controversial, but James Roberts, MD, and Martha Roberts, ACNP, CEN, note that it likely does not matter exactly what is done. Read their blog post on hand burn management at http://bit.ly/ProceduralPause, and then watch this video as Ms. Roberts drains the blister of a large burn.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:43
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the performance anxiety associated with this condition by teaching how to mix up the phenylephrine used for intracavernosal blocks, which means this penile compartment syndrome doesn’t languish while EPs wait for the urologist. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 6:34
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Cockroaches love to hide in warm, dark places, and living proof is the number of patients presenting with cockroaches in their external ear canals. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and watch these videos to learn more about removing these cringe-inducing creatures.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:01
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the anxiety demonstrating how to set up an aspiration and irrigation system, which dramatically simplifies the entire process. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: Christine Butts, MD
Duration: 0:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Read Dr. Butts’ article, “Think SUPRAclavicular for Subclavian Lines,” in the July 2013 issue, and then view this video that shows the technique to assess the venous anatomy of the neck and to identify the subclavian vein (SCV). The high-frequency transducer should be placed in the transverse orientation just lateral to the trachea. Once the internal jugular (IJ) is identified, it can be followed inferiorly until it is seen to join the SCV. Angling the transducer anteriorly will help to visualize this junction.