M2E Too! Mellick's Multimedia EduBlog Videos

Creator:   Editor
Created:   1/30/2013
Contains:  105 items
Larry Mellick, MD, presents important clinical pearls in short videos.

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Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:23
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick looks at the evidence for double simultaneous defibrillation, which appears to work in the electrophysiology lab and that anecdotal evidence has shown saves lives in the prehospital setting and in the emergency department. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
The time for possible salvage and survival of a torsed testicle is commonly thought to be six to eight hours, but Dr. Larry Mellick says one patient’s testicle was saved after 70 hours. Watch this video of torsion in a 15-year-old, and find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. Listen in to this video as Dr. Mellick discusses double sickening in this mother’s daughter. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A number of older clinical concepts may be unfamiliar to younger clinicians, but these clinical concepts are useful in pediatric medicine. Some of these concepts showed up in the medical literature for the first time nearly a century ago, but experience has borne out their effectiveness. Listen in to this video as Dr. Mellick discusses double sickening in this mother’s daughter. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:47
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Varicella cases have markedly declined, and presentations are often atypical since the advent of immunizations, so younger physicians are less aware of the appearance and clinical presentations of this viral infection. This video shows disseminated varicella in an HIV patient. Find out more in Dr. Mellick’s blog and video at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:51
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Multiple methods are touted for reducing anterior shoulder dislocations, but the Davos technique is a nontraumatic, patient-controlled, and auto-reduction technique that does not require the use of anesthesia. Dr. Larry Mellick reviews it in this video and blog post, which you can find at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:43
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the performance anxiety associated with this condition by teaching how to mix up the phenylephrine used for intracavernosal blocks, which means this penile compartment syndrome doesn’t languish while EPs wait for the urologist. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:01
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the anxiety demonstrating how to set up an aspiration and irrigation system, which dramatically simplifies the entire process. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:01
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the anxiety demonstrating how to set up an aspiration and irrigation system, which dramatically simplifies the entire process. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:43
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick says emergency physicians have mental blocks when it comes to managing priapism. He helps dispel some of the performance anxiety associated with this condition by teaching how to mix up the phenylephrine used for intracavernosal blocks, which means this penile compartment syndrome doesn’t languish while EPs wait for the urologist. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:48
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Pediatric trauma patients on backboards and in cervical collars often have their airways partially compromised. Dr. Larry Mellick advocates for teaching EMTs how to maintain an open airway and neutral cervical spine. Read his blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to see how to perform this simple technique.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:19
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick acknowledges the bad blood that sometimes exists between emergency medicine and surgery, but says there are many times he is grateful for his surgical colleagues, like in this video. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to see him talk about a patient with a devastating leg injury.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:35
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick acknowledges the bad blood that sometimes exists between emergency medicine and surgery, but says there are many times he is grateful for his surgical colleagues, like in this video. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to see him talk about a patient with a stiletto heel injury.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:43
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick acknowledges the bad blood that sometimes exists between emergency medicine and surgery, but says there are many times he is grateful for his surgical colleagues, like in this video. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to see him talk about a patient with a cherry bomb injury.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:08
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Larry Mellick acknowledges the bad blood that sometimes exists between emergency medicine and surgery, but says there are many times he is grateful for his surgical colleagues, like in this video. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to see him talk about a patient with a chainsaw injury.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:07
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Ketamine is a fascinating drug with multiple potential applications in the emergency department, but emergency physicians should consider this phencyclidine-like dissociative agent for pain management. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to hear how ketamine helped this patient with cancer pain.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:28
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Levamisole is used to cut cocaine, and in the process induces antibodies that cause a distinctive vasculopathic purpura typically involving the ears, nose, cheeks, and extremities. This video from Dr. Larry Mellick shows the devastating effects it can have on cocaine users. Find more information in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:06
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
FDA withdrew levamisole from the human market in 1999. Once used to treat cancer, various skin conditions, and immunological renal diseases, this veterinary medicine has found a fairly widespread role as an adulterant in illicit cocaine since 2003. This video from Dr. Larry Mellick shows the devastating effects it can have on cocaine users. Find more information in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:59
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency physicians, expert at a wide variety of procedures, will continue to play an important rill in performing the procedures traditionally done by other specialties. Watch this video, the third of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see a needle aspiration of a peritonsillar abscess. Find more information about prcoedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:39
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Whether performing advanced airway procedures or splinting orthopedic fractures, emergency physicians are expert at performing the routine procedures of other specialties. Watch this video, the second of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see a procedure requiring placement of a nasopharyngoscope. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency medicine has continuously redefined itself by absorbing expertise traditionally owned by other specialties. The tracheostomy is a case in point. Watch this video, the first of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see replacement of a tracheostomy tube. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:59
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency physicians, expert at a wide variety of procedures, will continue to play an important rill in performing the procedures traditionally done by other specialties. Watch this video, the third of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see a needle aspiration of a peritonsillar abscess. Find more information about prcoedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:39
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Whether performing advanced airway procedures or splinting orthopedic fractures, emergency physicians are expert at performing the routine procedures of other specialties. Watch this video, the second of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see a procedure requiring placement of a nasopharyngoscope. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Emergency medicine has continuously redefined itself by absorbing expertise traditionally owned by other specialties. The tracheostomy is a case in point. Watch this video, the first of three this month from Dr. Larry Mellick, to see replacement of a tracheostomy tube. Find more information about procedures in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:21
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare, and factors such as the dislocation duration, patient comorbidities, prior dislocation events, and associated fractures or bony lesions will determine the specific technique used. Watch this video, the second of three from Dr. Larry Mellick this month, to learn tips for reducing a posterior shoulder reduction. Find more information about shoulder reductions in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:45
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Shoulder dislocations are fairly common orthopedic emergencies presenting to the emergency department. Watch this video, the first of three from Dr. Larry Mellick this month, to learn tips for reducing an inferior shoulder reduction. Find more information about shoulder reductions in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:33
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
There is no higher stress or professionally memorable procedure than the open thoracotomy. This is one of the most time-sensitive procedures, and is unquestionably the most invasive procedure in emergency medicine. Watch this video from Dr. Larry Mellick, and find more information in his vlog at http://bit.ly/Mellick.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Don’t cringe when you think of giving epinephrine outside of cardiac arrest, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate techniques for giving well calibrated and exact doses of epinephrine. This first video shows pulse dosing during intubation. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 0:32
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This first video shows the track marks associated with repeated intravenous injection. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:24
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This third video shows the diffuse petechiae from septic emboli of life-threatening infective endocarditis. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick , and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:57
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Diseases and complications associated with intravenous drug use are many and varied, says Dr. Larry Mellick. These three videos demonstrate three skin findings associated with drug addiction and IV drug use. This second video shows the piloerection that accompanies withdrawal. Read his video introduction at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 13:47
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
It’s such a simple concept, yet has so many potential life-saving applications. The Abdominal Aortic and Junctional Tourniquet may be the future of advanced cardiac life support. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and then watch this video to learn more about how the AAJT, fresh from the battlefield, is saving lives in the ED.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 6:34
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Cockroaches love to hide in warm, dark places, and living proof is the number of patients presenting with cockroaches in their external ear canals. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and watch these videos to learn more about removing these cringe-inducing creatures.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:32
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Cockroaches love to hide in warm, dark places, and living proof is the number of patients presenting with cockroaches in their external ear canals. Read Dr. Mellick’s blog post at http://bit.ly/Mellick, and watch these videos to learn more about removing these cringe-inducing creatures.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 1:24
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
For a fantastic instructive 1:24-minute video on treating paronychia, just watch Dr. Larry Mellick, a professor of emergency medicine at the Medical College of Georgia, at work.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 12:14
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Chest tube placement borders on the barbaric, says Dr. Mellick. The use of large-bore chest drainage devices is not supported by most guidelines, and he explains in this month’s EduBlog that needle aspiration is just as effective, with a small-bore chest drain working if needle aspiration fails.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:11
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Group A Streptococcal infections of the pharynx are definitely on the rise at this time of year. Despite a recent trend to downplay this much-debated condition, timely treatment is still recommended, says Dr. Larry Mellick, to prevent acute rheumatic fever and suppurative complications such as peritonsillar abscesses, cervical lymphadenitis, and mastoiditis.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:57
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome isn’t life- or limb-threatening, but it remains diagnostically elusive for many EPs. Dr. Larry Mellick says the next time you see a patient with severe cyclic nausea and vomiting that is relieved by hot showers, ask about marijuana use.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:34
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:20
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:53
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
A tripwire is a wire stretched near ground level that activates a booby trap, and some chief complaints come with their own built-in tripwires. Without a doubt, acute scrotal pain is one of those, and torsion of the testicle is one cause of acute scrotal pain that emergency physicians cannot afford to miss.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 9:19
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Many pediatric patients with nasal foreign bodies present to the emergency department for chief complaints unrelated to the nose. Once the diagnosis is made, however, a variety of techniques can resolve the problem in the ED, but be sure you know when need an ENT consult.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 3:22
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Many pediatric patients with nasal foreign bodies present to the emergency department for chief complaints unrelated to the nose. Once the diagnosis is made, however, a variety of techniques can resolve the problem in the ED, but be sure you know when need an ENT consult.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 8:22
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Dr. Mellick’s suspicions smoldered for years; he even thought the problem resided with his technique. But one patient made him realize that the textbooks were just wrong: Wire cutters were not going to release a zipper from penile skin.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 2:39
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
High-quality team leadership is central to good code team organization and a well-run resuscitation. It is has never been studied or proven that good code team organization makes a difference in patient outcomes, but personal experience and face validity suggest valuable benefits.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 11:13
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
High-quality team leadership is central to good code team organization and a well-run resuscitation. It is has never been studied or proven that good code team organization makes a difference in patient outcomes, but personal experience and face validity suggest valuable benefits.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:34
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 5:20
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
New laryngoscopy technology brings with it new problems. Instead of worrying about dead blade handle batteries or burned out light bulbs, EPs have to cope with broken cables, malfunctioning screens, damaged light sources, and missing pieces, says Dr. Mellick. Direct laryngoscopy, therefore, will never disappear from his training program.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 12:14
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Chest tube placement borders on the barbaric, says Dr. Mellick. The use of large-bore chest drainage devices is not supported by most guidelines, and he explains in this month’s EduBlog that needle aspiration is just as effective, with a small-bore chest drain working if needle aspiration fails.
Creator: Larry Mellick, MD
Duration: 4:02
Journal: Emergency Medicine News
Pausing chest compressions for even a few seconds reduces the chances that CPR will be successful, but CPR always screeches to a halt for defibrillation. Dr. Larry Mellick demonstrates why there’s no need to be hands-off during defib.
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