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Egyptian Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery:
doi: 10.1097/01.OMX.0000438042.82272.88
Research Paper

Hemodynamics during intravenous conscious sedation: an institutional experience

Gadicherla, Srikantha; Kamath, Abhay T.a; Muthanna, Cariappa K.a; Bhagania, Manisha; Pentapati, Kalyana C.b

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Abstract

Aim: Our study aimed to evaluate the hemodynamic parameters during conscious sedation.

Materials and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 55 patients who had been treated for dental conditions under conscious intravenous sedation. Conscious sedation was performed either with propofol or midazolam with fentanyl. The local anesthetic (lignocaine) was administered once good sedation had been achieved in all patients with a vasoconstrictor. Data on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels were obtained at 12 different levels.

Results: Only 48 patients had complete data on hemodynamic parameters. With respect to the mean HR, no significant difference was observed at baseline, at sedation, and at injection of the local anesthetic, whereas significantly higher mean HR was observed in the midazolam group at the time of incision, during the surgery, suturing, and recovery. The mean BP was significantly higher in the midazolam group at all the intervals. The mean SpO2 was significantly higher for midazolam at baseline, 20 min during the surgery, and during suturing. At all other intervals, there was no significant difference in the mean SpO2 between both groups. The mean HR varied with time in the propofol group, whereas no significant difference was observed in the midazolam group (P=0.027 and 0.108), respectively. The mean BP varied with time in both groups (P<0.001 and <0.001), respectively. The mean SpO2 varied with time in the midazolam group, whereas no significant difference was observed in the propofol group (P=0.033 and 0.177), respectively.

Conclusion: Both drugs appear to be safe and efficacious for intravenous conscious sedation.

© 2014 Egyptian Associations of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

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