Benzophenones: Erratum

Dermatitis:
doi: 10.1097/01.DER.0000445306.10213.71
Erratum

    Heurung AR, Raju SI, Warshaw EM. Benzophenones. Dermatitis 2014;25:3–10

    Page 5 (in table), second row, fourth column under photoallergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-2, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Shaw37-1

    Page 5 (in table), third row, third column under allergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-3, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Torres24-1

    Bilsland25-2

    Szczurko 32-1

    Rademacher26-1

    Darvay27-8

    Crouch28-1

    Nedorost31-1

    Kiec- Swierczynska 35-1

    Bryden18-9

    Rodriguez36-2

    Hughes14-3

    Scalf 19-3

    Travassos17-5

    Sasseville21-1

    EMCPPTS12-6

    Greenspoon13-17

    Page 5 (in table), third row, fourth column under photoallergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-3, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Szczurko32-35

    Horn39-1

    Darvay27-14

    Crouch28-3

    Nedorost31-1

    Kiec-Swierczynska 35-1

    Bryden18-27

    Rodriguez36-22

    Scalf 19-5

    Cardoso34-3

    Shaw37-1

    Victor29-3

    EMCPPTS12-37

    Greenspoon13-12

    Page 5 (in table), fourth row, third column under allergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-4, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Ramsay8- 1

    Bryden18-18

    Hughes14-13

    Scalf19-6

    Travassos17-7

    Sasseville21-1

    Greenspoon13-3

    Page 5 (in table), fourth row, fourth column under photoallergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-4, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Bryden18-7

    Rodriguez36-2

    Scalf 19-8

    Cardoso34-3

    Victor 29-3

    EMCPPTS12-3

    Page 6 (below table): The table legend should include “Abbreviations: pet. = in petrolatum; NR = no reactions”

    Page 7 (in table), third row, third column: under allergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-8, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Pariser 20-1

    Sasseville21-1

    Page 7 (in table), fifth row, third column under allergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-10, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Millard22-2

    English23-6

    Torres24-1

    Bilsland25-6

    Rademacher26-1

    Darvay27-13

    Crouch28-3

    Hughes14-1

    Page 7 (in table), fifth row, fourth column under photoallergic contact dermatitis for benzophenone-10, authors’ reference numbers should be as follows:

    Burry30-1

    Torres24-1

    Szczurko32-1

    Darvay27-9

    Kiec-Swierczynska35-1

    Rodriguez36-2

    Cardoso34-1

    Page 8

    -first paragraph, at bottom, after “cross-sectional surveys.”, references should read “17,18” instead of “18,31”

    -first paragraph, last sentence, references should read “14,19” instead of “14,17”.

    -second paragraph, second sentence after “...allergic contact dermatitis to benzophenone-8 have been published.” References cited should be “20,21” instead of “17,18”

    -second paragraph, middle of last sentence, after “benzophenone-10 have been reported,” references should read “14, 22–28”

    -second paragraph, end of last sentence, cited references should read “12, 29” instead of “12,26”

    Under PHOTOALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS:

    -first sentence, reference citation should read “30” instead of “27”.

    -third sentence, after “..conducted in the United States,” references should read “19, 29, 31” instead of “16, 27, 28”

    -third sentence, after “..been even greater.”, references should read “12,18, 27,32” instead of “11,12,29”

    -sixth sentence, after “..moisturizer as the allergen source.”, references should read “32” instead of “30”.

    -last sentence, after “..reading on the beach”, reference cited should be “33” instead of “31”

    -second column, first line, after “and abroad.”, references should read “12,18,34” instead of “27,30,32”

    -second column, first paragraph, last sentence, references should read “19” instead of “16”

    -second column, second paragraph, first line, after “..1983 to 1998”, references should read “27” instead of “25”

    -second column, second paragraph, last sentence, references should read “24, 30, 35, 36” instead of “22, 28, 31–34”.

    -second column, third paragraph, first sentence, reference cited should be “37” instead of “16”

    Under PATCH TESTS

    -After “..benzophenone-8 up to 3%.”, reference cited should be “38” instead of “35”.

    Under CROSS-REACTIONS

    -First sentence, no reference should be cited, instead of citing “19, 37”.

    -Second sentence after “..benzophenone-8 could not be determined.”, reference cited should be “21” instead of “36”

    Page 9

    -First paragraph, second sentence, after “..benzophenone-3 when it is irradiated with sunlight.”, reference cited should be “39” instead of “37”

    -first paragraph, third sentence, “Parsol 1789” should read “Parsol 1789 (Nutritional Products, LLC, Heerlen, Netherlands).”

    -first paragraph, after “...cholesterol-lowering agent fenofibrate.”, reference cited should be “40” instead of “38”.

    Under BENZOPHENONES AND SYSTEMIC REACTIONS

    -first paragraph, fourth sentence, after “..milk after topical application”, reference cited should be “41” instead of “39”.

    -first paragraph, seventh sentence, after “..benzophenone-3 in both cases” references cited should be “5, 42” instead of “5, 40”.

    -first paragraph, ninth sentence, after “..dose-dependent estrogenic activity” reference cited should be “43” instead of “41”.

    -first paragraph, eleventh sentence, after “Kerdivel et al” reference cited should be “44” instead of “42”.

    -first paragraph, second to last sentence, after “..an endometriosis diagnosis” reference cited should be “45” instead of “43”.

    Under SUMMARY

    -second column, middle of paragraph – please completely delete the sentence “ This expanded use has undoubtedly.....with 2009–1010 NACDG data.” So should read “...various cosmetic. Benzopehone-3 is the most common sunscreen contact and photocontact allergen in North America. (new ref 46, 47 here)”

    -second column, second to last sentence after “..ACDS Core Screening Series.”, reference cited should be “48” instead of “46”.

    Under REFERENCES

    Correct order of reference citations is as follows:

    1. Scheuer E, Warshaw E. Sunscreen allergy: a review of epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and responsible allergens. Dermatitis 2006;17:3–11.

    2. Knox JM, Guin J, Cockerell EG. Benzophenones; ultraviolet light absorbing agents. J Invest Dermatol 1957;29:435–444.

    3. Fisher AA. Sunscreen dermatitis: part IIIVthe benzophenones. Cutis 1992;50:331–332.

    4. Scheman A, Jacob S, Katta R, et al. Part 4 of a 4-part series miscellaneous products: trends and alternatives in deodorants, antiperspirants, sunblocks, shaving products, powders, and wipes: data from the American Contact Alternatives Group. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2011;4(10):36–39.

    5. Emonet S, Pasche-Koo F, Perin-Minisini MJ, et al. Anaphylaxis to oxybenzone, a frequent constituent of sunscreens. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2001;107:556–557.

    6. Bourrain JL, Amblard P, Béani JC. Contact urticaria photoinduced by benzophenones. Contact Dermatitis 2003;48:45–46.

    7. Landers M, Law S, Storrs FJ. Contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis from oxybenzone. Am J Contact Dermat 2003;14:33–34.

    8. Ramsay DL, Cohen HJ, Baer RL. Allergic reaction to benzophenone. Simultaneous occurrence of urticarial and contact sensitivities. Arch Dermatol 1972;105(6):906–908.

    9. Warshaw EM, Wang MZ, Maibach HI, et al. Patch test reactions associated with sunscreen products and the importance of testing to an expanded series: retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 2001 to 2010. Dermatitis 2013;24:176–182.

    10. Nixon RL. Contact dermatitis to sunscreens. Dermatitis 2012;23:140–141.

    11. Karlsson I, Vanden Broecke K, Mårtensson J, et al. Clinical and experimental studies of octocrylene’s allergenic potency. Contact Dermatitis 2011;64:343–352.

    12. European Multicentre Photopatch Test Study (EMCPPTS) Taskforce. A European multicentre photopatch test study. Br J Dermatol 2012;166:1002–1009.

    13. Greenspoon J, Ahluwalia R, Juma N, et al. Allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis: a 10-year experience. Dermatitis 2013;24(1):29–32.

    14. Hughes TM, Stone NM. Benzophenone 4: an emerging allergen in cosmetics and toiletries? Contact Dermatitis 2007;56:153–156.

    15. Alanko K, Jolanki R, Estlander T, et al. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from benzophenone-4 in hair-care products. Contact Dermatitis 2001;44:188.

    16. Caruana DM, McPherson T, Cooper S. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by benzophenone-4 in a printer. Contact Dermatitis 2011;64:183–184.

    17. Travassos AR, Claes L, Boey L, et al. Non-fragrance allergens in specific cosmetic products. Contact Dermatitis 2011;65:276–285.

    18. Bryden AM, Moseley H, Ibbotson SH, et al. Photopatch testing of 1155 patients: results of the U.K. multicentre photopatch study group. Br J Dermatol 2006;155:737–747.

    19. Scalf LA, Davis MD, Rohlinger AL, et al. Photopatch testing of 182 patients: a 6-year experience at the Mayo Clinic. Dermatitis 2009;20:44–52.

    20. Pariser RJ. Contact dermatitis to dioxybenzone. Contact Dermatitis 1977;3:172.

    21. Sasseville D, Nantel-Battista M, Molinari R. Multiple contact allergies to benzophenones. Contact Dermatitis 2011;65:179–180.

    22. Millard LG, Barrett PL. Contact allergy from Mexenone masquerading as an exacerbation of light sensitivity. Contact Dermatitis 1980;6:222–223.

    23. English JS, White IR, Cronin E. Sensitivity to sunscreens. Contact Dermatitis 1987;17:159–162.

    24. Torres V, Correia T. Contact and photocontact allergy to oxybenzone and mexenone. Contact Dermatitis 1991;25:126.

    25. Bilsland D, Ferguson J. Contact allergy to sunscreen chemicals in photosensitivity dermatitis/actinic reticuloid syndrome (PD/AR) and polymorphic light eruption (PLE). Contact Dermatitis 1993;29:70–73.

    26. Rademaker M. Occupational contact dermatitis among New Zealand farmers. Australas J Dermatol 1998;39:164–167.

    27. Darvay A, White IR, Rycroft RJ, et al. Photoallergic contact dermatitis is uncommon. Br J Dermatol 2001;145:597–601.

    28. Crouch RB, Foley PA, Baker CS. The results of photopatch testing 172 patients to sunscreening agents at the photobiology clinic, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne. Australas J Dermatol 2002;43:74.

    29. Victor FC, Cohen DE, Soter NA. A 20-year analysis of previous and emerging allergens that elicit photoallergic contact dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol 2010;62:605–610.

    30. Burry JN. Photo allergies from benzophenones and beta carotene in sunscreens. Contact Dermatitis 1980;6:211–212.

    31. Nedorost ST. Facial erythema as a result of benzophenone allergy. J Am Acad Dermatol 2003;49:S259–S261.

    32. Szczurko C, Dompmartin A, Michel M, et al. Photocontact allergy to oxybenzone: ten years of experience. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 1994;10:144–147.

    33. Infante Hernando L, Serra-Baldrich E, Dordal T, et al. Photoallergic contact dermatitis caused by benzophenones in magazine inks. Contact Dermatitis 2013;69:124–126.

    34. Cardoso JC, Canelas MM, Gonçalo M, et al. Photopatch testing with an extended series of photoallergens: a 5-year study. Contact Dermatitis 2009;60:325–329.

    35. Kiec-Swierczynska M, Krecisz B, Swierczynska-Machura D. Photoallergic and allergic reaction to 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone (sunscreen) and allergy to cetyl alcohol in cosmetic cream. Contact Dermatitis 2005;53:170–171.

    36. Rodrıguez E, Valbuena MC, Rey M, et al. Causal agents of photoallergic contact dermatitis diagnosed in the national institute of dermatology of Colombia. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2006;22:189–192.

    37. Shaw T, Simpson B, Wilson B, et al. True photo allergy to sunscreens is rare despite popular belief. Dermatitis 2010;21:185–198.

    38. US Food and Drug Administration. Code of Federal Regulations Title 21-Food and Drugs, Chapter I-Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, Subchapter D- Drugs for Human Use. Part 352 Sunscreen Drug Products for OTC Human Use. Volume 5, Revise as of April 1, 2012. Available at http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=352. Accessed September 22, 2013.

    39. Horn HM, Humphreys F, Aldridge RD. Contact dermatitis and prolonged photosensitivity induced by ketoprofen and associated with sensitivity to benzophenone-3. Contact Dermatitis 1998;38:353–354.

    40. Deleo VA. Photocontact dermatitis. Dermatol Ther 2004;17:279–288.

    41. Feldmann RJ, Maibach HI. Absorption of some organic compounds through the skin in man. J Invest Dermatol 1970;54:399–404.

    42. Yesudian PD, King CM. Severe contact urticaria and anaphylaxis from benzophenone-3(2-hydroxy 4-methoxy benzophenone). Contact Dermatitis 2002;46(1):55–56.

    43. Shlumpf M, Cotton B, Conscience M, et al. In vitro and in vivo estrogenicity of UV screens. Environ Health Perspect 2001;109:239–244.

    44. Kerdivel G, LeGuevel R, Habauzit D, et al. Estrogenic potency of benzophenone UVfilters in breast cancer cells: proliferative and transcriptional activity substantiated by docking analysis. PLoS One 2013;8(4):e60567.

    45. Kunisue T, Chen Z, Buck Louis GM, et al. Urinary concentrations of benzophenone-type UV filters in U.S. women and their association with endometriosis. Environ Sci Technol 2012;46(8):4624–4632.

    46. Warshaw EM, Belsito DV, Taylor JS, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results: 2009 to 2010. Dermatitis 2013;24(2):50–59.

    47. Marks JG, Belsito DV, DeLeo VA, et al. North American Contact Dermatitis Group patch test results for the detection of delayed-type hypersensitivity to topical allergens. J Am Acad Dermatol 1998;38(6 Pt 1):911–918.

    48. Schalock PC, Dunnick CA, Nedorost S, et al. American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergen Series. Dermatitis 2013;24:7–9.

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