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The Effect of Intensive Care Unit Environments on Nurse Perceptions of Family Presence During Resuscitation and Invasive Procedures

Carroll, Diane L. PhD, RN

Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing: January/February 2014 - Volume 33 - Issue 1 - p 34–39
doi: 10.1097/DCC.0000000000000010
Research DIMENSION

Background: In a growing number of requests, family members are asking for proximity to their family member during resuscitation and invasive procedures.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the impact of intensive care unit environments on nurse perception of family presence during resuscitation and invasive procedures.

Research Methods: The study used a descriptive survey design with nurses from 9 intensive care units using the Family Presence Self-confidence Scale for resuscitation/invasive procedures that measures nurses’ perception of self-confidence and Family Presence Risk-Benefit Scale for resuscitation and invasive procedures that measures nurses’ perception of risks/benefits related to managing resuscitation and invasive procedures with family present.

Results: There were 207 nurses who responded: 14 male and 184 female nurses (9 missing data), with mean age of 41 ± 11 years, with a mean of 15 years in critical care practice. The environments were defined as surgical (n = 68), medical (n = 43), pediatric/neonatal (n = 34), and mixed adult medical/surgical (n = 36) intensive care units. There were significant differences in self-confidence, with medical and pediatric intensive care unit nurses rating more self-confidence for family presence during resuscitation (F = 7.73, P < .000) and invasive procedures (F = 6.41, P < .000). There were significant differences in risks/benefits with medical and pediatric intensive care unit nurses rating lower risk and higher benefit for resuscitation (F = 7.73, P < .000).

Discussion: Perceptions of family presence were significantly higher for pediatric and medical intensive care unit nurses. Further education and support may be needed in the surgical and mixed intensive care units. Evidence-based practice guidelines that are family centered can define the procedures and resources for family presence, to ultimately promote professional practice.

In a growing number of requests, family members are asking for proximity to their family member during resuscitation and invasive procedures. A Descriptive survey design was used to measure the impact of intensive care unit environments on nurse perception of family presence during resuscitation and invasive procedures using the Family Presence Self-Confidence Scale for resuscitation/invasive procedures. Nurses from 9 intensive care units were included in this study.

Diane L. Carroll, PhD, RN, is the Yvonne L. Munn nurse researcher at the Munn Center for Nursing Research, Institute for Patient Care, Massachusetts General Hospital Boston MA 02114.

The author has disclosed that she has no significant relationships with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Diane L. Carroll, PhD, RN, Munn Center for Nursing Research, Institute for Patient Care, Professional Office Building 426, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (dcarroll3@partners.org).

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins