Skip Navigation LinksHome > Published Ahead-of-Print > Impact of Corneal Cross-linking on Drug Penetration in an Ex...
Cornea:
doi: 10.1097/ICO.0b013e31823e29d5
Basic Investigation: PDF Only

Impact of Corneal Cross-linking on Drug Penetration in an Ex Vivo Porcine Eye Model.

Tschopp, Markus MD; Stary, Johannes; Frueh, Beatrice E. MD; Thormann, Wolfgang PhD; De Smet, Julie; Van Bocxlaer, Jan PhD; Tappeiner, Christoph MD

Published Ahead-of-Print
Collapse Box

Abstract

Purpose: To analyze the influence of corneal cross-linking (CXL) using ultraviolet-A and riboflavin on corneal drug penetration of topically applied drugs.

Methods: In an ex vivo porcine eye model, eyes were randomly assigned to CXL or control treatment. Central corneal thickness and anterior chamber depth were measured with a Pentacam device. In the CXL group, eyes were treated with CXL using ultraviolet-A (370 nm) and riboflavin, whereas in the control group only riboflavin was applied without irradiation. Subsequently, 0.3% ofloxacin (n = 40 eyes) or 1% voriconazole (n = 40 eyes) eye drops were applied to the cornea every 5 minutes for 30 minutes. Aqueous humour samples were obtained performing an anterior chamber tap. The concentrations of ofloxacin and voriconazole were determined with high-pressure liquid chromatography. Groups were compared performing a Mann-Whitney test.

Results: In the CXL group, the mean concentration of ofloxacin (13.33 +/- 4.67 [mu]g/mL) and voriconazole (52.70 +/- 8.76 [mu]g/mL) was significantly lower than in the untreated control group (ofloxacin: 18.51 +/- 6.08 [mu]g/mL, P = 0.005; voriconazole: 62.43 +/- 13.5 [mu]g/mL, P = 0.01). This corresponds to a reduction in permeability of 27.98% for ofloxacin and 15.59% for voriconazole. Central corneal thickness and anterior chamber depth were comparable in the CXL and control groups (P > 0.05, each).

Conclusions: CXL reduces the corneal permeability of ofloxacin and voriconazole. This may be of clinical significance, for example, in keratitis treatment.

Copyright (C) 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Login

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.