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In Vitro Antimicrobial Long-Term Evaluation of Corneal Preservation Media Against Microorganisms Using A Closed-Chamber Study Model

Hoshino Ruiz, Diego R. MD*,†; Wu, Davi Chen MD*; Holzchuh, Ricardo MD*,†; Mimica, Lycia M. J. MD; Silva, Cely B. MS; Hida, Richard Y. MD*,†

Cornea:
doi: 10.1097/ICO.0b013e3182a124e1
Basic Investigation
Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the existence of in vitro long-term antimicrobial activity of Optisol-GS against microorganisms related to corneal infection using a closed-chamber study model.

Methods: Optisol-GS was contaminated with microorganisms related to corneal infections, and different times after contamination was analyzed using a closed-chamber study model. Microbial growths were analyzed by macroscopic observation.

Results: For Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, bacterial growth was observed in samples taken 1 hour through 7 days and 14 days after contamination occurred. For Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Candida albicans, microbial growth was observed in all samples studied. For Streptococcus pneumoniae, bacterial growth was observed in samples taken 1 hour through 72 hours after contamination. For Streptococcus pyogenes, bacterial growth was observed in samples taken 1 hour through 7 days after contamination. For Escherichia coli, bacterial growth was observed in samples taken 1 hour through 48 hours after contamination occurred.

Conclusions: We conclude that no in vitro antimicrobial effect for any microorganism analyzed was observed in contaminated Optisol-GS after 72 hours; however, effective antimicrobial activity was observed for S. aureus, Str. pneumoniae, Str. pyogenes, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli after 7 to 10 days.

Author Information

*Department of Ophthalmology, Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil;

Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital das Clínicas of University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; and

Department of Microbiology, Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Reprints: Richard Y. Hida, Rua Afonso de Freitas, 488 Apt 61, São Paulo 04006-052, Brazil (e-mail: ryhida@gmail.com).

The authors have no funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Drs. Hida and Ruiz contributed equally to the work and request acknowledgment as double first authors.

Received March 30, 2013

Accepted June 18, 2013

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.