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Combined Use of Subconjunctival and Intracorneal Bevacizumab Injection for Corneal Neovascularization

Yeung, Sonia N MD, PhD, FRCSC; Lichtinger, Alejandro MD; Kim, Peter MBBS(Hons), FRANZCO; Amiran, Maoz D MD; Slomovic, Allan R MA, MD, FRCSC

doi: 10.1097/ICO.0b013e31821379aa
Clinical Science

Purpose: To report on the safety and clinical use of combined subconjunctival and intracorneal bevacizumab for corneal neovascularization.

Methods: The charts of 12 consecutive patients with corneal neovascularization who received combined subconjunctival and intracorneal injections of bevacizumab (2.5 mg/0.1 mL) were reviewed. Patients received 1 to 3 injections of 2.5 mg of bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL subconjunctival and 1.25 mg/0.05 mL intrastromal). Morphological changes were assessed clinically by 1 investigator.

Results: Combined subconjunctival and intracorneal injections of bevacizumab were effective and well-tolerated. No significant ocular or systemic adverse events were observed during 6.4 months (range, 0.25-22 months) of follow-up. All patients showed a reduction in the neovascularized area.

Conclusions: Short-term results suggest that combined subconjunctival and intracorneal injections of bevacizumab are an effective method for reducing corneal neovascularization. It may be a useful option or adjunct to other treatments in stabilizing or improving vision.

From the Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Received for publication October 25, 2010; revision received January 23, 2011; accepted January 30, 2011.

The authors state that they have no financial or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Reprints: Sonia N. Yeung, Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Western Hospital, University of Toronto, 399 Bathurst Street, East Wing 6E 401, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8 (e-mail: sonia.y@gmail.com).

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.