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Diclofenac Sodium, 0.1% (Voltaren Ophtha), Versus Sodium Chloride, 5%, in the Treatment of Filamentary Keratitis

Avisar, Rahamim M.D.; Robinson, Anat M.D.; Appel, Itiel M.D.; Yassur, Yuval M.D.; Weinberger, Dov M.D.

Cornea:
Clinical Sciences
Abstract

Purpose. To compare the efficacy and short-term safety of diclofenac sodium, 0.1% (Voltaren Ophtha; Ciba-Vision) and of sodium chloride, 5% ophthalmic solution, in the treatment of filamentary keratitis (FK) in patients with dry-eye syndrome due to secondary Sjögren's syndrome.

Methods. Thirty-two patients (64 eyes) with dry-eye syndrome due to secondary Sjögren' syndrome were enrolled in a randomized study (patients and authors were aware of which medication was being used). All patients had FK. Sixteen patients were treated with sodium chloride, 5% drops, and 16 patients received diclofenac sodium, 0.1% eyedrops. Treatment regimen included instillation of 1 drop, 4 times a day for 28 days, for both groups. Clinical assessment was performed once a week during the study period. Data on the efficacy and safety of the different therapeutic regimens were collected and compared.

Results. Both medications achieved disappearance of filaments at the end of the study. Treatment with diclofenac sodium, 0.1%, revealed a significantly more rapid improvement of the clinical symptoms as compared with sodium chloride, 5%. No significant adverse effects were observed in both groups.

Conclusion. Diclofenac sodium, 0.1%, may be an effective and safe topical therapy in patients with FK caused by secondary Sjögren's disease.

Author Information

From the External Eye Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Campus Golda, Petach-Tikva, and Tel Aviv University Sackler School of Medicine, Israel.

Submitted December 2, 1998.

Revision received March 8, 1999.

Accepted April 9, 1999.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. R. Avisar, Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Campus Golda, 7, Keren Kayemet Street, Petach-Tikva, Israel.

© 2000 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.