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CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology:
doi: 10.1212/01.CON.0000451013.87789.07
Issue Overview

Issue Overview

Free Access

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in NeurologyNeurology of Systemic Diseas, Volume 20 Issue 3, June 2014

Issue Overview

Neurology of Systemic Disease, June 2014;20(3)

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology® is designed to help practicing neurologists stay abreast of advances in the field while simultaneously developing lifelong self-directed learning skills.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of the Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology Neurology of Systemic Disease issue, participants will be able to:

▸ Describe, diagnose, and treat the various neuromuscular complications of diabetes mellitus

▸ Recognize the diverse neurologic presentations of sarcoidosis in patients with or without a previous diagnosis of sarcoidosis

▸ Describe the complex interplay between the endocrine system and the nervous system and recognize the various neurologic complications of nondiabetic endocrine disorders

▸ Understand the principles of the major surgical procedures for weight loss in order to identify patients at risk for significant neurologic complications, including CNS or peripheral nervous system involvement

▸ Recognize and address the myriad neurologic issues that can arise in the septic patient in order to best preserve neurologic function

▸ Identify the many medical disorders that can manifest with seizures in order to develop a rational diagnostic workup for seizures that includes assessing for possible underlying systemic triggers

▸ Describe, diagnose, and treat the multiple neurologic complications of alcoholism, including those that involve the CNS and those that involve the peripheral nervous system

▸ Identify the various neurologic complications of drug abuse, including the effects of both older drugs and newer drugs

▸ Recognize the many neurologic complications that can arise in the setting of underlying rheumatologic disorders in order to best identify and manage patients who may develop these complications

▸ Describe and initiate management of the myriad neurologic complications of acute or chronic liver disease

▸ Identify and evaluate the ethical arguments for and against orthotopic liver transplantion in patients with hepatic encephalopathy and alcohol dependence

▸ Recognize common challenges in transitions of care and apply techniques to reduce communication errors

Core Competencies

The Continuum Stroke issue covers the following core competencies:

▸ Patient Care

▸ Medical Knowledge

▸ Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

▸ Interpersonal and Communication Skills

▸ Professionalism

▸ Systems-Based Practice

Disclosures

CONTRIBUTORS

Joseph E. Safdieh, MD, FAAN, Guest Editor

Vice Chairman for Education; Associate Professor of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

aDr Safdieh receives research support from Accera, Inc, and serves on the speakers bureau for Supernus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

bDr Safdieh reports no disclosure.

Vera Bril, BSc, MD, FRCP(c)

Professor, University of Toronto; Chief of Neurology, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

aDr Bril has received grant support and personal compensation for consultancy work from Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co, Ltd; Eisai, Inc; Eli Lilly and Company; Pfizer Inc; and Grifols, Canada, Ltd. Dr Bril has also received grant support from Cebix Incorporated, CSL Behring, and Novartis Corporation, as well as unrestricted educational fellow support from Grifols, Canada, Ltd.

bDr Bril discusses the unlabeled use of gabapentin, amitriptyline, morphine, and oxycodone for the treatment of neuromuscular complications of diabetes mellitus.

John C. M. Brust, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York

aDr Brust serves as an editor for Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports and has received compensation for reviewing medical records related to a hospital malpractice suit.

bDr Brust reports no disclosure.

Jonathan M. Goldstein, MD

Director of Perioperative Neurology; Associate Attending Neurologist; Neurology, Neuromuscular Diseases, and Electromyography, Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Neurology, New York, New York

aDr Goldstein has served on advisory panels for CSL-Behring and Grifols and as a speaker for Athena Diagnostics, Inc.

bDr Goldstein discusses the unlabeled use of cyclophosphamide, rituximab, methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine.

Sara E. Hocker, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

a,bDr Hocker reports no disclosures.

Anna Hohler, MD, FAAN

Associate Professor of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

aDr Hohler has received personal compensation for activities with Teva Neuroscience and travel expenses were paid by the AAN for attending meetings of BrainPAC and the Quality and Safety Subcommittee.

bDr Hohler reports no disclosure.

Makoto Ishii, MD, PhD

Instructor in Neuroscience, Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York

aDr Ishii has received an unrestricted research grant from the Leon Levy Foundation.

bDr Ishii reports no disclosure.

Steven Karceski, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York

aDr Karceski serves as an associate editor of Neurology and as a speaker for Cyberonics, Inc.

bDr Karceski reports no disclosure.

Neeraj Kumar, MD

Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

a,bDr Kumar reports no disclosures.

Jessica D. Lee, MD, FAAN

Neurology Director, University of Kentucky HealthCare Stroke Program; Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky

aDr Lee has received grant support from the NIH and her travel expenses were paid by the AAN for attending meetings of the Quality and Safety Subcommittee.

bDr Lee reports no disclosure.

James M. Noble, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, New York

aDr Noble receives grants from the National Institutes of Aging and the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

bDr Nobel reports no disclosure.

Amy Premetz, MS, RHIA

Manager of Ambulatory Coding and Education, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois

a,bMs Premetz reports no disclosures.

Barney J. Stern, MD, FAAN

Professor, Department of Neurology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland

aDr Stern has served as an expert witness, as editor of The Neurologist, and serves on the Data and Safety Monitoring Board and as a medical safety monitor at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dr Stern receives research support from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Remedy Pharmaceuticals.

bDr Stern reports no disclosure.

Jinny O. Tavee, MD

Assistant Professor, Lerner College of Medicine Center; Neuromuscular Fellowship Program Director, Cleveland Clinic, Neuromuscular Center, Cleveland, Ohio

aDr Tavee is involved in a clinical trial funded by Araim Pharmaceuticals, Inc, evaluating the use of ARA290 in patients with small fiber neuropathy related to sarcoidosis.

bDr Tavee reports no disclosure.

Benjamin David Tolchin, MD, MS

Neurology Resident, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York

a,bDr Tolchin reports no disclosures.

Allison L. Weathers, MD

Associate Chief Medical Information Officer; Associate Professor, Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois

aDr Weathers has received honoraria for grand rounds and lectures given for the Los Angeles Neurological Society, Wake Forest Neurology Department, and the North Carolina Neurological Society. Dr Weathers also received travel reimbursement for participation on AAN committees.

bDr Weathers reports no disclosure.

Louis H. Weimer, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, New York

a,bDr Weimer reports no disclosure.

Halina White, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medical College and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

aDr White holds $25,000 of stock in Tethys Bioscience, Inc.

bDr White reports no dislosures.

Eelco F. M. Wijdicks, MD, PhD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology; Chair, Division of Critical Care Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

a,bDr Wijdicks reports no disclosures.

Joshua Z. Willey, MD, MS

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Columbia University, New York, New York

aDr Willey has received a K-23 grant from the NIH and an honorarium from the American College of Physicians for the Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program.

bDr Willey reports no disclosure.

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MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION WRITERS

Eduardo E. Benarroch, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

a,bDr Benarroch reports no disclosures.

D. Joanne Lynn, MD, FAAN

Associate Dean for Student Life and Clinical Professor of Neurology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio

aDr Lynn receives honorarium for her work as a question writer from Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology and receives book royalties from Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Dr Lynn holds stock in Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Corning Incorporated, General Electric, and Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

bDr Lynn reports no disclosure.

aRelationship Disclosure

bUnlabeled Use of Products/Investigational Use Disclosure

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Methods of Participation and Instructions for Use

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology® is designed to help practicing neurologists stay abreast of advances in the field while simultaneously developing lifelong self-directed learning skills. In Continuum, the process of absorbing, integrating, and applying the material presented is as important as, if not more important than, the material itself.

The goals of Continuum include disseminating up-to-date information to the practicing neurologist in a lively, interactive format; fostering self-assessment and lifelong study skills; encouraging critical thinking; and, in the final analysis, strengthening and improving patient care.

Each Continuum issue is prepared by distinguished faculty who are acknowledged leaders in their respective fields. Six issues are published annually and are composed of review articles, case-based discussions on ethical and practice issues related to the issue topic, coding information, and comprehensive CME and self-assessment offerings, including a self-assessment pretest, multiple-choice questions with preferred responses, and a patient management problem. For detailed instructions regarding Continuum CME and self-assessment activities, visit aan.com/continuum/cme.

The review articles emphasize clinical issues emerging in the field in recent years. Case reports and vignettes are used liberally, as are tables and illustrations. Video material relating to the issue topic accompanies issues when applicable.

The text can be reviewed and digested most effectively by establishing a regular schedule of study in the office or at home, either alone or in an interactive group. If subscribers use such regular and perhaps new study habits, Continuum’s goal of establishing lifelong learning patterns can be met.

Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Neurology.

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