Text sizing:
A
A
A
CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology:
doi: 10.1212/01.CON.0000446125.16283.99
Issue Overview

Issue Overview

Free Access

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in NeurologyStroke, Volume 20, Issue 2, April 2014

Issue Overview

Stroke, April 2014;20(2)

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology® is designed to help practicing neurologists stay abreast of advances in the field while simultaneously developing lifelong self-directed learning skills.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of the Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology Stroke issue, participants will be able to:

▸ Provide an overview of emergent evaluation of the stroke patient with an emphasis on practical issues regarding ischemic stroke treatment

▸ Summarize the recommendations for management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, diet, physical activity, and lifestyle choices commonly encountered in neurologic practice

▸ Describe the diagnostic workup and management options for cardioembolic stroke

▸ Outline the primary findings of recent randomized clinical trials clarifying the treatment options for conditions such as carotid stenosis and intracranial atherosclerosis and provide current recommendations for treatment

▸ Discuss the most up-to-date literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of cerebral venous thrombosis

▸ Summarize the evaluation and management of ischemic stroke in young adults, with an emphasis on cervical artery dissection, patent foramen ovale, and hypercoagulable states

▸ Discuss pediatric arterial ischemic stroke, from recognition and diagnosis to the short-term and long-term management based on current available literature

▸ Explain the epidemiology, screening strategies, and management options for patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms

▸ Describe the clinical and radiographic features, genetic determinants, and treatment options for the most well-characterized monogenic disorders associated with stroke

▸ List the predictors of functional outcome and mortality after ischemic stroke

▸ Discuss the ethical issues raised by telephone consultations for the administration of tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke

▸ Estimate the costs of the stroke diagnostic evaluation and identify scenarios in which tests have low clinical yield

Core Competencies

The Continuum Stroke issue covers the following core competencies:

▸ Patient Care

▸ Medical Knowledge

▸ Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

▸ Interpersonal and Communication Skills

▸ Professionalism

▸ Systems-Based Practice

Disclosures

CONTRIBUTORS

Adam G. Kelly, MD, Guest Editor

Assistant Professor of Neurology, University of Rochester Medical Center; Chief of Neurology, Highland Hospital, Rochester, New York

aDr Kelly has received research support from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation and compensation from the American Academy of Neurology as a question writer for Continuum.

bDr Kelly reports no disclosure.

Kevin M. Barrett, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

aDr Barrett receives support from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for his role in the Stroke Hyperglycemia Insulin Network Effort (SHINE) trial and has received a speaking honorarium for a Lee Memorial Health System continuing medical education course.

bDr Barrett reports no disclosure.

Pratik D. Bhattacharya, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Wayne State University; Chief of Neurology and Director of Stroke Services, Sinai-Grace Hospital, Detroit, Michigan

aDr Bhattacharya has received a research grant from the Ethel & James Flinn Foundation to study poststroke depression in stroke patients.

bDr Bhattacharya reports no disclosure.

James F. Burke, MD, MS

Assistant Professor, Stroke Program and Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

aDr Burke has reviewed case materials for medical malpractice defense cases and receives funding from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

bDr Burke reports no disclosure.

Cheryl Bushnell, MD, MHS

Associate Professor of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine; Director, Wake Forest Baptist Stroke Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

aDr Bushnell has received grants from the Hazel K. Goddess Fund for Stroke Research in Women, the North Carolina Stroke Care Collaborative, the World Federation of Neurology, and the World Stroke Organization.

bDr Bushnell reports no disclosure.

Seemant Chaturvedi, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Stroke Program Director, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

aDr Chaturvedi has received compensation for expert witness testimony and research support from AstraZeneca, Daiichi Sankyo, and Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. Dr Chaturvedi serves as a consultant for Abbott Vascular and W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc; on the executive committee of the Asymptomatic Carotid Trial (ACT)–1 and Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST)–2 studies; and as a contributing editor to NEJM Journal Watch Neurology.

bDr Chaturvedi reports no disclosure.

Ji Y. Chong, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medical College; Stroke Center Director, New York Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital, New York, New York

a,bDr Chong reports no disclosures.

Bart M. Demaerschalk, MD, MSc, FRCP(C)

Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona

a,bDr Demaerschalk reports no disclosures.

Gabrielle deVeber, MD

Professor of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

aDr deVeber’s spouse holds an investment of more than $10,000 in Thornhill Research Inc.

bDr deVeber reports no disclosure.

Timothy J. Ingall, MB BS, PhD

Associate Professor of Neurology, Cerebrovascular Diseases Center, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona

a,bDr Ingall reports no disclosures.

Pooja Khatri, MD, MSc

Professor of Neurology, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

aDr Khatri has received research grants from the NIH and research support from Penumbra Inc and Genentech, Inc.

bDr Khatri discusses the use of IV tissue plasminogen activator for minor stroke and of endovascular therapy for stroke treatment, neither of which are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Anthony S. Kim, MD, MAS

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology; Medical Director, UCSF Stroke Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California

aDr Kim has received research grants from the American Heart Association, the NIH, and SanBio, Inc; has served as an expert witness providing record review in a court case; and has received an honorarium and travel expenses for speaking at an American Neurological Association training course.

bDr Kim reports no disclosure.

Jason Mackey, MD, MS

Assistant Professor of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana

aDr Mackey has served as an expert medical record reviewer in vascular neurology for a court case and has received funding as the principal investigator for outcomes and processes of care in intracerebral hemorrhage for the Indiana University Health Values Fund and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute Project Development Team.

bDr Mackey reports no disclosure.

James F. Meschia, MD, FAAN

Professor and Chair, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

aDr Meschia serves on the editorial board of the European Journal of Neurology and receives support from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for his roles in the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy versus Stenting Trial (CREST) and the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN).

bDr Meschia reports no disclosure.

Mahendra Moharir, MD, MSc, FRACP

Staff Neurologist and Assistant Professor, Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

a,bDr Moharir reports no disclosures.

Shyam Prabhakaran, MD, MS

Associate Professor, Department of Neurology; Director of Stroke Research, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois

aDr Prabhakaran has served as an author of UpToDate and received research support as a principal investigator from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the American Stroke Association.

bDr Prabhakaran reports no disclosure.

David A. Rempe, MD, PhD

Stroke Medical Director, Mercy Hospital, St Louis, Missouri

a,bDr Rempe reports no disclosures.

Gustavo Saposnik, MD, MSc, FAHA, FRCP(C)

Associate Professor and Clinician Scientist; Director, Stroke Outcomes Research Center, St Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

aDr Saposnik is supported by the Distinguished Clinician Scientist Award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

bDr Saposnik reports no disclosure.

Justin A. Sattin, MD

Assistant Professor and Residency Program Director, Department of Neurology; Medical Director, University of Wisconsin Health Comprehensive Stroke Program, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin

a,bDr Sattin reports no disclosures.

Back to Top | Article Outline

MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION WRITERS

Ronnie Bergen, MD

Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, University of Arizona College of Medicine; Staff Neurologist, Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Tucson, Arizona

a,bDr Bergen reports no disclosures.

Douglas J. Gelb, MD, PhD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

aDr Gelb has received personal compensation in an editorial capacity for Continuum.

bDr Gelb reports no disclosure.

aRelationship Disclosure

bUnlabeled Use of Products/Investigational Use Disclosure

Back to Top | Article Outline

Methods of Participation and Instructions for Use

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology® is designed to help practicing neurologists stay abreast of advances in the field while simultaneously developing lifelong self-directed learning skills. In Continuum, the process of absorbing, integrating, and applying the material presented is as important as, if not more important than, the material itself.

The goals of Continuum include disseminating up-to-date information to the practicing neurologist in a lively, interactive format; fostering self-assessment and lifelong study skills; encouraging critical thinking; and, in the final analysis, strengthening and improving patient care.

Each Continuum issue is prepared by distinguished faculty who are acknowledged leaders in their respective fields. Six issues are published annually and are composed of review articles, case-based discussions on ethical and practice issues related to the issue topic, coding information, and comprehensive CME and self-assessment offerings, including a self-assessment pretest, multiple-choice questions with preferred responses, and a patient management problem. For detailed instructions regarding Continuum CME and self-assessment activities, visit aan.com/continuum/cme.

The review articles emphasize clinical issues emerging in the field in recent years. Case reports and vignettes are used liberally, as are tables and illustrations. Video material relating to the issue topic accompanies issues when applicable.

The text can be reviewed and digested most effectively by establishing a regular schedule of study in the office or at home, either alone or in an interactive group. If subscribers use such regular and perhaps new study habits, Continuum’s goal of establishing lifelong learning patterns can be met.

Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Neurology.

Login