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DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION IN MOVEMENT DISORDERS

Siddiqui, Mustafa Saad; Haq, Ihtsham ul; Okun, Michael S.

doi: 10.1212/01.CON.0000348903.94715.b4
Article

After more than 2 decades since it was introduced, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has gained widespread popularity as a surgical treatment for medically refractory symptoms of Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. In this chapter, authors review the benefits, risks, indications, limitations, and targets for DBS in patients with Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. A brief outline of the DBS procedure and programming is also given.

Relationship Disclosure: Dr Siddiqui has received personal compensation for speaking engagements from GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, and Teva Pharmaceuticals. Dr Siddiqui's compensation and/or research work has been funded, entirely or in part, by a grant to his university from a pharmaceutical or device company for multicenter clinical trials. Dr ul Haq has nothing to disclose. Dr Okun has received personal compensation for speaking and consulting activities from Medtronic, Inc., and National Parkinson Foundation. Dr Okun has received personal compensation for serving as medical director of the National Parkinson Foundation. Dr Okun's compensation and/or research work has been funded, entirely or in part, by a grant to his university from the National Institutes of Health and the National Parkinson Foundation.

Unlabeled Use of Products/Investigational Use Disclosure: Drs Siddiqui and Okun have nothing to disclose. Dr ul Haq discusses the investigational use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

© 2010 American Academy of Neurology
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