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Psychosomatic disorders in pregnancy

Tam, Wing Hung; Chung, Tony

Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology: April 2007 - Volume 19 - Issue 2 - p 126–132
doi: 10.1097/GCO.0b013e3280825614
Maternal-fetal medicine

Purpose of review Common and important psychosomatic disorders in pregnancy reviewed here include perinatal depression, posttraumatic stress disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and postpartum psychosis.

Recent findings Research has focused on antenatal depression as postpartum depression often has onset prior to delivery. Certain psychosocial and psychological interventions can effectively prevent postnatal depression. Although the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was associated with miscarriage, preterm delivery, and fetal death, discontinuation of antidepressants also increased the relapse rate during pregnancy. Studies also show that about 8% of mothers had eating problems during their pregnancy, which increased to 19% in the postpartum period. Postpartum psychosis is an important diagnosis related to maternal death from suicide. Personal and family history of bipolar disorders are important risk factors.

Summary Recent findings highlight the importance of correct diagnosis and awareness of serious mental illness. In view of the higher rate of relapse, women should be counselled carefully regarding discontinuation of antidepressants during pregnancy. Differentiation of posttraumatic stress disorders with comorbid anxiety and depression, awareness of risk factors, and clinical features of psychosis are important in the management of psychosomatic disorders in pregnancy.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sha Tin, New Territories, Hong Kong

Correspondence to Dr Wing Hung Tam, MBChB, MRCOG, The Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sha Tin, New Territories, Hong Kong Tel: +852 2632 2812; fax: +852 2636 0008; e-mail: tamwh@cuhk.edu.hk

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.