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Oxidized fat in the diet, postprandial lipaemia and cardiovascular disease

Cohn, Jeffrey S.

Articles

Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidized fats and lipid oxidation products in the diet can contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes studies that show that oxidized fat and lipid oxidation products are present in human foods; that these compounds are absorbed by the intestine and appear in the blood circulation; and that these ingested substances can have deleterious cardiovascular effects in both humans and experimental animals. However, considerable additional research is required to establish the extent to which dietary fat oxidation poses a threat to human health and/or longevity.

Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Clinical Research Institute of Montréal, Québec, Canada

Correspondence to: Jeffrey S. Cohn PhD, Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Clinical Research Institute of Montréal, 110 Pine Avenue West, Québec, Canada, H2W 1R7

Tel: +1 514 987 5666; fax: +1 514 987 5700; e‐mail: cohnj@ircm.qc.ca

© 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.