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Immune reconstitution disease associated with mycobacterial infections

Lawn, Stephen Da,b; Lipman, Marc Cc; Easterbrook, Philippa Jd,e

Current Opinion in HIV & AIDS: July 2008 - Volume 3 - Issue 4 - p 425–431
doi: 10.1097/COH.0b013e3282fe99dc
Immune restoration disease: Edited by Robert Colebunders and Martyn French

Purpose of review: We review immune reconstitution disease associated with mycobacterial infections in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment. We draw particular attention to data relevant to resource-limited settings and focus predominantly on publications over the past year.

Recent findings: Worldwide mycobacteria are the most important group of pathogens associated with immune reconstitution disease. In cohorts of patients with tuberculosis in high-income countries, up to one-third develop immune reconstitution disease compared with only 8–13% in current reports from resource-limited settings. We speculate on potential explanations for this difference. While most cases of tuberculosis immune reconstitution disease are self-limiting, deaths have been reported in South African and Thai cohorts. We discuss how risk and outcomes of tuberculosis immune reconstitution disease represent key variables regarding the optimum time to initiate antiretroviral treatment in tuberculosis patients. A new conceptual framework has been proposed regarding ‘unmasking’ of tuberculosis during antiretroviral treatment. Increasing numbers of cases of leprosy immune reconstitution disease and Bacillus Calmette–Guérin immune reconstitution disease have also been reported, mainly from resource-limited settings. Immune reconstitution disease associated with a variety of mycobacteria (tuberculous and nontuberculous) was common in a cohort of Thai children.

Summary: Immune reconstitution disease associated with a range of mycobacteria constitutes a challenge to delivery of antiretroviral treatment worldwide. Data concerning the pathogenesis and management of all forms of mycobacterial immune reconstitution disease are lacking.

aDesmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute for Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa

bClinical Research Unit, Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK

cDepartment of HIV Medicine, Royal Free Hospital, UK

dDepartment of HIV/Genitourinary Medicine, King's College London, King's College and St. Thomas' Hospitals, London, UK

eInfectious Diseases Institute, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

Correspondence to Dr Stephen D. Lawn, Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7925. Cape Town, South Africa Tel: +27 21 650 6957; fax: +27 21 650 6963; e-mail: stevelawn@yahoo.co.uk

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.