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Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology:
doi: 10.1097/ACO.0000000000000095
ANESTHESIA OUTSIDE THE OPERATING ROOM: Edited by Marc Van de Velde

Intraoperative MRI for neurosurgical and general surgical interventions

Henrichs, Bernadettea; Walsh, Robert P.b

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Abstract

Purpose of review

The use of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IMRI) during surgeries and procedures has expanded in the last decade. Not only is it becoming more commonly used for a variety of adult and pediatric neurosurgical procedures, but also its use has expanded to other types of surgeries. Along with using IMRI for removing tumors of the spinal cord, surgeons are now using it for other types of surgical operations of the kidney and liver. The increased utilization during the intraoperative period warrants the anesthesia provider to assure that patients and staff are unharmed because of increased risk of the powerful magnet.

Recent findings

Recent literature is reviewed regarding the expansive use of IMRI in the operating and procedure room. Safety issues and anesthetic implications are also addressed.

Summary

IMRI is becoming increasingly more popular, especially with neurosurgeons, but its use is also expanding to other types of surgeries. Because of the increased use, the anesthesia provider must be aware of the dangers that it imposes to those involved and take necessary safety precautions. This will help assure that no one is harmed during the operation or procedure.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

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