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Nonallergen-specific treatments for food allergy

Lieberman, Jay A.; Wang, Julie

Current Opinion in Allergy & Clinical Immunology: June 2012 - Volume 12 - Issue 3 - p 293–301
doi: 10.1097/ACI.0b013e3283534cf8
FOOD ALLERGY: Edited by Alessandro Fiocchi and Julie Wang

Purpose of review: This review summarizes recent reports on nonallergen-specific therapies for food allergy. These therapies are especially appealing for food allergy because unlike allergen-specific immunotherapy, they would allow the treatment of multiple food allergies in a single patient with one therapy.

Recent findings: Chinese herbal therapy, anti-IgE, probiotics, engineered lactic acid bacteria, and helminth therapy are all examples of allergen nonspecific therapies that have been investigated in recent years. Although some have only been studied in animal models of food allergy, some are undergoing rigorous, human clinical trials.

Summary: Increasing amounts of research are examining the efficacy and safety of nonallergen-specific therapies for food allergy. There is hope that clinicians will have effective treatments either as an alternative or as an adjunct to immunotherapy.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Elliot and Roslyn Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA

Correspondence to Julie Wang, MD, Division of Allergy & Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1198, New York, NY 10029, USA. Tel: +1 212 241 5548; fax: +1 212 426 1902; e-mail: julie.wang@mssm.edu

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