Skip Navigation LinksHome > April 2012 - Volume 12 - Issue 2 > Irritant-induced asthma
Current Opinion in Allergy & Clinical Immunology:
doi: 10.1097/ACI.0b013e32835143b8
OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE: Edited by Susan M. Tarlo and Piero Maestrelli

Irritant-induced asthma

Labrecque, Manon

Collapse Box

Abstract

Purpose of review: To describe the recent insights into the definition, causes, natural outcome, and key elements of irritant-induced asthma (IIA) management.

Recent findings: IIA is a subtype of occupational asthma without immunologic sensitization and includes the typical reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS) and a more gradual form called not-so-sudden IIA, when onset of asthma follows repeated low-dose exposure to irritants. The World Trade Center tragedy brought new insight in the understanding of IIA, suggesting that it can exhibit a prolonged interval between exposure and recognition of clinical symptoms and disease. Dimethyl sulfate has been recently reported to cause RADS and repeated diesel exhaust exposure to cause not-so-sudden IIA in patients who worked in a bus garage. Cleaning workers who are exposed to a large variety of irritants and sensitizers are especially at risk of occupational asthma and IIA.

Summary: IIA includes RADS and not-so-sudden IIA. Outcome of IIA is as poor as occupational asthma with sensitization. Treatment of IIA does not differ from standard asthma treatment, but high-dose vitamin D could be assessed further for possible therapeutic benefit.

Copyright © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Login

Article Tools

Share

Article Level Metrics

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.