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Primary Strategies for HPV Infection and Cervical Cancer Prevention

HARPER, DIANE M. MD, MPH, MS*; DEMARS, LESLIE R. MD

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology: June 2014 - Volume 57 - Issue 2 - p 256–278
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0000000000000027
Preventing Morbidity and Mortality from Cervical Cancer in the New Millennium

Counseling messages for tobacco cessation, condom use, circumcision, and selective choice in the number of sexual partners can help reduce the risk of cervical cancer. Other sexual behavioral and reproductive risk factors for cervical cancer are a younger age at first intercourse and at first full-term pregnancy as well as increasing duration of combined hormonal oral contraceptive use. Micronutrients and supplements can reduce the risk of human papillomavirus infection, persistence, progression, and regression. Some human papillomavirus infections can be prevented by vaccination. Cervical cancer is best prevented by screening.

*Departments of Family and Geriatric Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bioengineering, Epidemiology and Population Health, Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky;

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire

The authors declare that they have nothing to disclose.

Correspondence: Diane M. Harper, MD, MPH, MS, Departments of Family and Geriatric Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bioengineering, Epidemiology and Population Health, Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY. E-mail: diane.m.harper@gmail.com

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.