Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Surgical Techniques for Removing Problematic Mesh

BARBER, MATTHEW D. MD, MHS

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology: June 2013 - Volume 56 - Issue 2 - p 289–302
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e3182856371
Devices and Meshes for the Surgical Treatment of Prolapse and Incontinence

The use of mesh and graft in pelvic reconstructive surgery has increased over the last decade. As the use of these products increased, the frequency and complexity of mesh-related complications has also increased. Management of complications resulting from mesh placement requires a thoughtful, systematic approach. Although many mesh complications can be managed nonsurgically, a significant proportion will require surgical excision of some or all of the mesh. Mesh excision is often successful in treating even serious complications, however a notable portion of patients will require more than 1 operation and complete symptom resolution is not always achieved.

Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio

The author declares that there is nothing to disclose.

Correspondence: Matthew D. Barber, MD, MHS, Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH. E-mail: barberm2@ccf.org

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.