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Smoking and Marijuana Use in Pregnancy

BROWN, HAYWOOD L. MD*; GRAVES, CORNELIA R. MD

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology: March 2013 - Volume 56 - Issue 1 - p 107–113
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e318282377d
Substance Abuse and Pregnancy

The obstetrical, neonatal, and childhood risk associated with prenatal smoking are well known. Prenatal smoking has been implicated in up to 25% of low birth weight infants primarily from preterm birth and fetal growth restriction and up to 10% of all infant mortality. The relationship between prenatal marijuana smoking and obstetrical and infant outcomes is less clear. Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug during pregnancy. Neither exposure to cigarette nor marijuana smoke has evidence for teratogenicity, but both have been implicated in developmental and hyperactivity disorders in children. Pregnant women should be counseled on the risk of both cigarette and marijuana smoking.

*Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina;

Tennessee Maternal Fetal Medicine, Baptist Hospital/St Thomas Health Systems, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

The authors declare that they have nothing to disclose.

Correspondence: Haywood L. Brown, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, DUMC, Box 3084, 203 Baker House, Durham, NC. E-mail: Haywood.brown@duke.edu

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.