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Measles, Mumps, and Rubella

WHITE, SARAH J. PhD*,†; BOLDT, KRISTI L. MD; HOLDITCH, SARA J. BS§; POLAND, GREGORY A. MD*,†; JACOBSON, ROBERT M. MD*,∥

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology:
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e31824df256
Prevention of Infection in the Obstetric Patient
Abstract

Measles, mumps, and rubella are viral diseases that may adversely affect nonimmune pregnant women and their fetuses/neonates. Prevention of these diseases and their complications can be achieved through measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination before pregnancy. The vaccine is contraindicated during pregnancy, because it contains live, attenuated viruses that pose a theoretical risk to the fetus. However, accidental receipt of MMR vaccination is not known to cause maternal/fetal complications. MMR immunization is recommended to nonimmune obstetric patients upon completion or termination of pregnancy.

Author Information

*Mayo Clinic Vaccine Research Group

Program in Translational Immunovirology and Biodefense

Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine;

§Mayo Graduate School, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Supported by National Institute of Health grants R01 AI33144-15, R01 AI48973-11, and UL1 RR024150-01.

G.A.P. chairs data monitoring committees for nonmeasles vaccines being developed by Merck & Co. R.M.J. also serves on a data monitoring committee and a safety review committee concerning nonmeasles vaccines produced by Merck & Co. The remaining authors declare that they have nothing to disclose.

Correspondence: Robert M. Jacobson, MD, Mayo Clinic Desk Ba3b, Rochester, MN. E-mail: Jacobson.Robert@mayo.edu

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.