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The Contraceptive Implant

HOHMANN, HEATHER MD*; CREININ, MITCHELL D. MD* †

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology: December 2007 - Volume 50 - Issue 4 - pp 907-917
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e318159c2f6
Hormonal Contraception

Contraceptive implants provide long-acting, highly effective reversible contraception. Currently, the only subdermal implant available to women in the United States is the single rod etonogestrel implant, Implanon (N.V. Organon, Oss, the Netherlands) approved by the Food and Drug Administration in July 2006. Implanon is currently approved for 3 years of use, provides excellent efficacy throughout its use, and is easy to insert and remove. Similar to other progestin-only contraceptives, Implanon can cause irregular vaginal bleeding. Implanon has been shown to be safe to use during lactation, may improve dysmenorrhea, and does not significantly affect bone mineral density, lipid profile, or liver enzymes.

*Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Sources of support: none.

Correspondence: Heather Hohmann, MD, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Magee-Womens Hospital, 300 Halket Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213. E-mail: hhohmann@mail.magee.edu

© 2007 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.