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Obesity and Lifestyle Management in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

HOEGER, KATHLEEN M. MD

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology: March 2007 - Volume 50 - Issue 1 - pp 277-294
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e31802f54c8
The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome is frequently associated with obesity, with at least 50% of women with polycystic ovary syndrome demonstrating overweight or obesity defined by body mass index >25 or >30 kg/m2. Overweight and obesity impact the clinical reproductive and metabolic features of the syndrome. Long-term complications of obesity such as cardiovascular risk and diabetes, as well as those over the short term in reproductive function, are significantly improved by lifestyle modification. Weight reduction is difficult to achieve over the long-term and programs designed for modest reduction in overall body weight (5% to 10%) with improvements in fitness are as effective as severe weight reduction in reducing metabolic disease and improving ovulatory potential. Further research is needed into the best approach for successful interventions that result in long-term sustained weight loss.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York

Supported in part by NIH grant 1 K23HD043881-01A1 and GCRC grant 5 M01 RR00044, National Center for Research Resources NIH, University of Rochester.

Correspondence: Kathleen M. Hoeger, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue Box 668, Rochester, NY 14642. E-mail: Kathy_Hoeger@urmc.rochester.edu

Conflict of interest statement: The author identifies no conflicts.

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.