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Diagnosis of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

TRIVAX, BRADLEY MD*; AZZIZ, RICARDO MD, MPH, MBA* † ‡

Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology:
doi: 10.1097/GRF.0b013e31802f351b
The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a diagnosis of exclusion, with other androgen excess and ovulatory dysfunction disorders to be ruled out. There are 3 principal features of the syndrome, including hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovarian morphology. These features have been included in slightly different permutations in the 3 criteria currently available to diagnose PCOS, including that of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) 1990, Rotterdam 2003, and the Androgen Excess Society 2006. Overall, at least 1 in 15 women of reproductive age will be affected by PCOS, making this disorder the most common endocrine abnormality in this age group, with a health burden of over 4 billion dollars in the United States alone.

Author Information

Departments of *Obstetrics and Gynecology

Medicine, The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California

Supported in part by NIH grant K24-HD01346 (RA).

Correspondence: Ricardo Azziz, MD, MPH, MBA, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 8635 West Third Street, Suite 160 W, Los Angeles, CA 90048. E-mail: azzizr@cshs.org

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.