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Eye & Contact Lens: Science & Clinical Practice:
doi: 10.1097/ICL.0000000000000019
Article

Risk Factors for Contact Lens–Induced Papillary Conjunctivitis Associated With Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lens Wear

Tagliaferri, Angela M.S.; Love, Thomas E. Ph.D.; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta B. O.D., M.S., Ph.D.

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Abstract

Background:

Contact lens–induced papillary conjunctivitis (CLPC) continues to be a major cause of dropout during extended wear of contact lenses. This retrospective study explores risk factors for the development of CLPC during extended wear of silicone hydrogel lenses.

Methods:

Data from 205 subjects enrolled in the Longitudinal Analysis of Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lens study wearing lotrafilcon A silicone hydrogel lenses for up to 30 days of continuous wear were used to determine risk factors for CLPC in this secondary analysis of the main cohort. The main covariates of interest included substantial lens-associated bacterial bioburden and topographically determined lens base curve-to-cornea fitting relationships. Additional covariates of interest included history of adverse events, time of year, race, education level, gender, and other subject demographics. Statistical analyses included univariate logistic regression to assess the impact of potential risk factors on the binary CLPC outcome and Cox proportional hazards regression to describe the impact of those factors on time-to-CLPC diagnosis.

Results:

Across 12 months of follow-up, 52 subjects (25%) experienced CLPC. No associations were found between the CLPC development and the presence of bacterial bioburden, lens-to-cornea fitting relationships, history of adverse events, gender, or race. Contact lens–induced papillary conjunctivitis development followed the same seasonal trends as the local peaks in environmental allergens.

Conclusions:

Lens fit and biodeposits, in the form of lens-associated bacterial bioburden, were not associated with the development of CLPC during extended wear with lotrafilcon A silicone hydrogel lenses.

© 2014 Contact Lens Association of Ophthalmologists

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