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Overnight Orthokeratology: Visual and Corneal Changes

Soni, P. Sarita O.D., M.S.; Nguyen, Tracy T. O.D.; Bonanno, Joseph A. O.D., Ph.D.

doi: 10.1097/01.ICL.0000072831.13880.A0
Article

Purpose. To achieve an optimal fit with reverse geometry Contex OK lenses and to determine a time course for and the stability of visual and corneal changes in achieving maximal refractive, corneal curvature, and corneal thickness changes after overnight wear of OK B and D series lenses.

Methods. This investigation was conducted under an Food and Drug Administration IDE G000059. Both eyes of 10 subjects were fitted with the lenses, and uncorrected visual acuity, refractive correction, contrast sensitivity, corneal curvature, and corneal thickness were measured at baseline and at 1 day, 1week, 1 month, and 3 months after lenses were worn. Except for baseline, data were collected at four different times during the day, immediately following lens removal and 4, 8, and 12 hours after lens removal.

Results. The results from eight subjects showed that uncorrected visual acuity, refractive correction, contrast sensitivity, and corneal curvature all changed significantly (P =0.01) overnight. By the end of 1 week, all corneal and visual changes had reached a maximal level and remained fairly stable during the day. These changes were sustained at 3 months. The epithelial thickness data from four subjects showed that the corneal epithelial thickness was reduced by approximately 19 μm after 3 months of lens wear.

Conclusions. Successful fitting of OK B and D series lenses requires a thorough understanding of the lens–cornea relationship.

Full effect of overnight orthokeratology is achieved by the end of 1 week. The visual and corneal changes remain stable for all waking hours of the day and allow patients to enjoy excellent device-free vision (20/20).

From the Borish Center for Ophthalmic Research, School of Optometry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

Accepted February 12, 2003.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. P.S. Soni, Borish Center for Ophthalmic Research, School of Optometry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47401; e-mail: sonip@indiana.edu

© 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.