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Willingness of Patients to Use Computers for Health Communication and Monitoring Following Myocardial Infarction

SHAW, RYAN J. PhD, RN; ZULLIG, LEAH L. PhD, MPH; CROWLEY, MATTHEW J. MD; GRAMBOW, STEVEN C. PhD; LINDQUIST, JENNIFER H. MS; SHAH, BIMAL R. MD, MBA; PETERSON, ERIC MD, MPH; BOSWORTH, HAYDEN B. PhD

CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: September 2015 - Volume 33 - Issue 9 - p 384–389
doi: 10.1097/CIN.0000000000000175
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We describe the computer use characteristics of 406 post–myocardial infarction (MI) patients and their willingness to engage online for health communication and monitoring. Most participants were computer users (n = 259; 63.8%) and half (n = 209; 51.5%) read health information online at least monthly. However, most participants did not go online to track health conditions (n = 283; 69.7%), look at medical records (n = 287; 70.7%), or e-mail doctors (n = 351; 86.5%). Most participants would consider using a Web site to e-mail doctors (n = 275; 67.7%), share medical information with doctors (n = 302; 74.4%), send biological data to their doctor (n = 308; 75.9%), look at medical records (n = 321; 79.1%), track health conditions (n = 331; 81.5%), and read about health conditions (n = 332; 81.8%). Sharing health information online with family members (n = 181; 44.6%) or for support groups (n = 223; 54.9%) was not of much interest. Most post-MI participants reported they were interested in communicating with their provider and tracking their health conditions online. Because patients with a history of MI tend to be older and are disproportionately minority, researchers and clinicians must be careful to design interventions that embrace post-MI patients of diverse backgrounds that both improve their access to care and health outcomes.

Author Affiliations: Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (Drs Shaw, Zullig, Crowley, and Bosworth and Ms Lindquist); School of Nursing (Drs Shaw and Bosworth); Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine (Drs Zullig and Bosworth); Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology (Dr Crowley); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics (Dr Grambow); Duke Clinical Research Institute (Drs Shah and Peterson); Division of Cardiology (Dr Peterson); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and School of Nursing (Dr Bosworth), Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

S.C.G. receives consulting fees from Gilead Sciences for serving on multiple Data and Safety Monitoring Boards (DSMBs). Although the relationship is not perceived to represent a conflict with the present work, it has been included in the spirit of full disclosure. The remaining authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationship with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

Corresponding author: Ryan Jeffrey Shaw, PhD, RN, School of Nursing,Duke University, DUMC 3322, 307 Trent Dr, Durham, NC 27705 (ryan.shaw@duke.edu).

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